take you to the 'B-part' [music]

Oleg68

Senior Member
Russian
What means in this contest "B-part"? (Hess is more - Yes boss)

Sugar sugar...
So close... and yet so far...
I would love to take you to the B-part...
But I'm afraid we're not quite there yet...
So darling... grab that mike again and give your best shot...
 
  • Myridon

    Senior Member
    English - US
    Two warnings to start:
    My first warning is that these are song lyrics which as a rule don't make sense and use language in odd ways.
    My second warning is that Mikkel Hess is from Denmark. This metaphor may make more sense in Danish.

    The song is a duet which seems to be comparing some sort of progression in singing (she has the mic and is working on the A-part and wants to move on to the B-part) and a progression in their sexual relationship. At the end of the video, when he says "Here comes the B part", a model train passes between her legs - the classical Freudian dream symbol for intercourse.
    I've studied singing, been in choruses, musicals, etc. all my life and this A part / B part makes no sense to me. Based on the name "A part", it sounds like the "A part" would be the good one.
     

    JamesM

    Senior Member
    In music, the "B" section is the section that changes from the original theme or introduces a new theme. For example, In "Somewhere Over the Rainbow" the "B" section starts with:

    "Some day I'll wish upon a star
    and wake up where the clouds are far behind me"

    So moving from "A" to "B" is also a type of development in the music.

    I don't know the artist or the song. I've learned quite a bit from reading Myridon's post. I'd only add that "grab that mike again" could also be a double entendre.
     

    Myridon

    Senior Member
    English - US
    I'd call that part of Somewhere Over the Rainbow "the bridge". If I were doing a duet, I'd rather be the one singing the chorus than the one singing the bridge so I still don't really see how moving on to the singing "B part" compares to moving on to intercourse.
     

    kitenok

    Senior Member
    I doubt that this matters much to Danish pop music, but I can state with certainty that the terms "A Part" and "B Part" are in common use among American folk musicians to describe the two alternating parts in a lot of traditional American fiddle tunes such as "Bonaparte's Retreat" (famously ripped off by Copeland in "Rodeo"). This is kind of a call-and-response structure, not a verse/bridge/chorus structure.
     

    Tunalagatta

    Senior Member
    English - England
    I happened to look at the video on Youtube. Someone asks this question in the comments section, and the reply is that the A-part means 'foreplay', and the B-part means 'complete intercourse', in a sexual context, of course. Obviously I can't vouch for the reliability of the source, but the song/video is pretty suggestive, so I imagine this might be the right interpretation.

    I don't know what it means in musical terms, apart from that it seems to mean, 'the next stage'. ?? If anyone is in a choir, is the B-part the 'bass' part? (and the A-part the 'alto'?)
     

    JamesM

    Senior Member
    I'd call that part of Somewhere Over the Rainbow "the bridge".

    The bridge is the "B" section of a 1940s pop chorus. The entire chorus has an A-B-A format typical of the day. (There is also an introductory verse that most people haven't heard that starts with "When all the world is a hopeless jumble...")

    For this song, the chorus starts with "Somewhere over the rainbow" (the "A" section), switches to the bridge ("B" section) and repeats the "A" section when it returns to "Somewhere over the rainbow (bluebirds fly)".
     
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    Myridon

    Senior Member
    English - US
    Well, we could continue this discussion (SotR is Intro-A-A-B-A?), but it's off-topic.
    The on-topic part for me is that you keep saying "B section" not "B part".
     

    Raeka

    Senior Member
    English - US
    I'm a musician in the US, and we often refer to the "B part." This Wikipedia article explains it in painful detail. The short version: "Binary form is usually characterised as having the form AB, though since both sections repeat, a more accurate description would be AABB."

    Often when we're learning a piece, we work on the A part first, and once we can play that all right, we move on to the B part.
     

    Raeka

    Senior Member
    English - US
    I realize that the Wikipedia article calls it the B "section," but, at least among the rock and folk musicians that I've played with in the US, it's also called B "part."
     

    Flaviuta

    New Member
    romanian
    b-parts

    The body below the waist, in particular the genitals, buttocks, and anus. ;) :)))) so....it has a sexual conotation :p
     

    filanfisteku

    New Member
    Albanian
    did any of you though that the "b-part" might mean "blow job"? that was my first thought when I heard this song today :D
     

    JamesM

    Senior Member
    Nope, that wouldn't occur to me, especially since it's the guy talking about taking the girl to the B-part. (Not anatomically impossible but not a likely inference, at least for me, and not the typical slang word used when it's a man giving it to a woman.)
     
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    Trotters79

    New Member
    Norwegian
    Nope, that wouldn't occur to me, especially since it's the guy talking about taking the girl to the B-part.

    The mentioned reference to music, to me, is vague at best. Especially when compared to the sexual one.

    To me, the "microphone" she's on (doing her best, showing him what she's got, trying to give him what he like; soft or hard) is one of flesh. Thus, the A part is foreplay, and he'd like to give her the B part (outlined by others before me), but they're not quite there yet. First she has to impress him with her skills; show him what she's got.

    The "Yes, Boss" reference suggest the nature of their relationship is either D/s or M/s (Dominant and submissive or Master and slave, both of which are explained by your favorite BDSM dictionary). This also explains why she has to beg him permission to move on to the B part. First she must earn the privilege. Deserve it. Show him what she's got.

    B part could actually also refer to Bondage, when I think of it.

    The official music video is quite explaining, although the second last (4th) verse is missing. The complete song goes a little something like this:

    They are on a date, and he's glad she could make it. He thinks they should get straight to business; thus, starting with foreplay. She wants to move on and do the next part (B), but first got to show him what she's got.

    So close, and yet so far. He'd love to take her the B part, but they're not quite there yet. Grab that "mike" again and give it your best shot.

    Oh yeah, that's what he calls sweat music. She's "playing" on his body. He really likes what she's doing, but she still has to work a little harder. Just a little harder.

    Oh yeah! Way to go! Now we're really getting somewhere. It's getting hot in there. He wants her to do what she's doing one more time, before moving on to the next part.

    Oh la la! I think you got me there, baby. Come along, here comes the B part.
    No more foreplay, as 007 would express it.
     
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