'Taken a violent dislike to me...' (from Hugh Lauries 'Mystery')

Hello, friends!
I've watched 'A bit of Fry and Laurie' again recently and decided to use the song from the title in my teaching practice, where I stopped at the following sentence:

'Taken a violent dislike to me
I'd be foolish to ignore the possibilities
That if we had ever actually met you might have hated me
Still, that's not the only problem that I can see.'

And now I wonder how to call this type of sentences properly (in terms of academic standards). Also, am I right to tell that it's just a kind of ellipsis peculiar to songs or poems? Or maybe it's a kind which we can find in colloquial language (if so, could you give me any other examples)? Is that correct to unscramble this sentence the following way: 'I've taken a violent dislike to me, so I think, I'd be foolish to ignore the possibilities...'?

Thank you very much.
 
  • Truffula

    Senior Member
    English - USA
    "Taken a violent dislike to me" means the same as "hated me" later in the lyrics. Therefore the rephrase should be "You might have taken a violent dislike to me" instead.

    Another site (musicmatch) had the lyrics with those phrases reversed, not changing the meaning:

    Hated me
    I'd be foolish to ignore the possibility
    That if we ever actually met
    You might have taken a really violent dislike to me
    Still that's not the only problem that I can see
     
    "Taken a violent dislike to me" means the same as "hated me" later in the lyrics. Therefore the rephrase should be "You might have taken a violent dislike to me" instead.

    Another site (musicmatch) had the lyrics with those phrases reversed, not changing the meaning:

    Hated me
    I'd be foolish to ignore the possibility
    That if we ever actually met
    You might have taken a really violent dislike to me
    Still that's not the only problem that I can see
    So he's just repeating the end of the sentence 'That if we had ever actually met you might have hated me' in other words ('taken a really violent dislike to me') at the beginning of the verse. It's not so complicated as I thought. Considered it first as a type of sentense like 'given the fact that he was there he might be a suspect'. Thank you for your response.
     
    Last edited:
    < Previous | Next >
    Top