taking care of my business in an office?

marcin k

Senior Member
Poland, polish
Hi everyone!

I'm quite at a loss as for appropriate verbs and the whole expressions used to say that you go to public offices to arrange different things like things connected with paying your taxes, obtaining different permissions, registering different business activities etc. If you refer to it generally without mentioning specifically the purpose(s) of your visit to a public office, do you say for example:
"I've got some business to take care of in public offices tomorrow"
or:
"Living in a city makes it easier for you to take care of your business in public offices."

Does the word "business" here cover not really business-related issues like aquiring a permission for building a new kennel for your dog?

How do you make "business" meaning different things plural? If I need to acquire 2 different permissions and return my tax form, which makes it 3 different things to get done with altogether, how do I refer to this number with the word "business"? Just like: "3 businesses to take care of?" or:
"3 things to take care of"? The former sounds strange to me.

Are there any other common words/phrases meaning 'public offices'?
Finally, if you were to say to someone something that I'm asking about, how would you say it, not necessarily using any of the words that I have.

Sorry for bothering you with such trifles, but it's been on my mind for quite some time and would like to tick it off finally:)
 
  • cuchuflete

    Senior Member
    EEUU-inglés
    Hi Marcin K,

    These are interesting questions. I suspect there may be some substantial differences between the AE [American English] and BE [British English] ways of saying such things. I'll offer some AE possibilities.

    I'm going to the town office to take care of some business/some matters.

    That statement could cover applications for permission to build an addition to a home, get a driver's license, pay taxes, etc.

    Your suggested "3 things to take care of" is just fine. "Business" may refer to non-commercial matters, whether or not dictionaries include such non-commercial activities.


    On the AE/BE front again, you wrote, "...would like to tick it off finally". In AE, to tick off usually means to annoy or make angry, although context makes your statement clear in this case.

    regards,
    Cuchu




    marcin k said:
    Hi everyone!

    I'm quite at a loss as for appropriate verbs and the whole expressions used to say that you go to public offices to arrange different things like things connected with paying your taxes, obtaining different permissions, registering different business activities etc. If you refer to it generally without mentioning specifically the purpose(s) of your visit to a public office, do you say for example:
    "I've got some business to take care of in public offices tomorrow"
    or:
    "Living in a city makes it easier for you to take care of your business in public offices."

    Does the word "business" here cover not really business-related issues like aquiring a permission for building a new kennel for your dog?

    How do you make "business" meaning different things plural? If I need to acquire 2 different permissions and return my tax form, which makes it 3 different things to get done with altogether, how do I refer to this number with the word "business"? Just like: "3 businesses to take care of?" or:
    "3 things to take care of"? The former sounds strange to me.

    Are there any other common words/phrases meaning 'public offices'?
    Finally, if you were to say to someone something that I'm asking about, how would you say it, not necessarily using any of the words that I have.

    Sorry for bothering you with such trifles, but it's been on my mind for quite some time and would like to tick it off finally:)
     

    jimreilly

    Senior Member
    American English
    Yes to all the things in the previous helpful answer.

    One also says (at least in AE) "three items of business", but "three things to do" is probably more common.

    As far as another phrase for "public offices", I usually just say I'm going to the Hennepin County Building (Hennepin is the county where I live); there are all kinds of county and state offices in the building as well as the passport office, etc. Or else I say I'm going to the City Hall, where the rest of such offices are. "Public offices" is perfectly clear and there's nothing wrong with it, but it's just not often used here. One usually says county office, tax assessor's office, city office, driver's license bureau, etc.
     

    Kelly B

    Senior Member
    USA English
    "Personal business" makes it more obvious that it does not involve a company, but I agree that it isn't necessary anyway.
     

    MrPedantic

    Senior Member
    UK, English
    Hello Marcin

    You can also "attend to" business, e.g.

    "I'm going into town tomorrow to attend to some business."

    MrP
     

    Amityville

    Senior Member
    English UK
    ...some administrative business...some admin. This is what I say but I'm not sure if other people do...immigrants have more of it to do than other people so they may be the only ones that feel the lack of a good short expression for it. I sometimes say 'some bureaucracy to deal with' if I'm fed up with it.
     

    marcin k

    Senior Member
    Poland, polish
    Many thanks to all of you. You've been very helpful. Hope to get as much help from you next time I need it. Without you posting your answers it would be hard to find how to say things naturally. I hope you do realise how enormously helpful you are:)
     

    cuchuflete

    Senior Member
    EEUU-inglés
    Marcin K,

    Thanks to you for your gracious reply, which is a not so common event. It's a pleasure to collaborate with you and the others who have contributed answers. We all learn from one another, and your well stated question is as much a contribution to that learning as the answers.

    regards,
    Cuchuflete
     
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