Tal lascia l'arrosto, che poi ne brama il fumo

  • Tede

    Senior Member
    USA - English
    Definately a dialect. Here's my take:

    Ti lascio all'arrosto, che puoi brama del fumo.
    I leave you to roast, that you may dream (wish?) of the fire.

    Better wait for a native for an accurate translation.
     

    archimede

    Senior Member
    Italian
    Doesn't seem a dialect to me, rather an old proverb or something like that (amazing the things I'm learning here about Italian!).

    Definitely it's il, not it; not sure about Tal and che.

    An extremely approximate translation could be: He/She leaves/abandons the roast in such a way that then he/she longs for its smoke.

    Does it make sense?

    Alessandro
     

    Silvia

    Senior Member
    Italian
    Tede said:
    Definately a dialect.
    Not at all! As Alessandro said.

    So he leaves the roast, to long for smoke afterwards.

    My personal guess: you leave something or snob something just to long for it when you can't have it anymore.

    Where did you find that phrase, anyway? It sounds like an aphorism.
     

    DesertCat

    Senior Member
    inglese | English
    silviap said:
    My personal guess: you leave something or snob something just to long for it when you can't have it anymore.
    Silvia, I think you meant "snub something" rather than snob.
     

    Quietwolf

    New Member
    USA ,English
    Good morning everyone. I'm a Chef and I trying to translate some recipes. And these little ditties are the hand written little notes tahat are next to the recipes.
     

    archimede

    Senior Member
    Italian
    Quietwolf said:
    Good morning everyone. I'm a Chef and I trying to translate some recipes. And these little ditties are the hand written little notes tahat are next to the recipes.
    Sorry, but I don't think the sentence has nothing to do with recipes or cooking in general... unless, as I was trying to explain, it is a (poetic) comment about a recipe:

    [Questa ricetta] tal lascia l'arrosto, che poi [se] ne brama il fumo

    Free translation:

    With this recipe the roast is so good that you will even long for its smoke

    HTH.

    Alessandro
     

    Silvia

    Senior Member
    Italian
    DesertCat said:
    Silvia, I think you meant "snub something" rather than snob.
    No, no! :D Too funny, I really meant snob! But now I realize that snob can't be used as a verb in English, while we do in Italian :eek:

    snobbare = sdegnare qualcosa/qualcuno in modo snob (in a snob manner)
     

    anamangeon

    Member
    Portugal - Portuguese
    silviap said:
    Not at all! As Alessandro said.

    So he leaves the roast, to long for smoke afterwards.

    My personal guess: you leave something or snob something just to long for it when you can't have it anymore.

    Where did you find that phrase, anyway? It sounds like an aphorism.
    That's how I read it too, i.e. like Silvia. A proverb [or a sentence following the proverb model], which conveys the idea of ''the grass always seems greener on the other side of the fence''
    Interesting:rolleyes:
    Ana:)
     
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