Talcum powder gives cooling

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  • Hermione Golightly

    Senior Member
    British English
    This is not natural standard English although it is understandable.
    The easiest way to say this is 'talcum powder is cooling'.
    We don't apply talcum powder, we use it, but there's no need to say anything of this sort because the meaning is obvious.
     

    Florentia52

    Modwoman in the attic
    English - United States
    But if we use it in an ad , so what can we say:
    Talcum powder caused cooling.
    Or
    It gives you cooling

    Why cannot we use apply with talcum powder?
    We wouldn't say that talcum powder "causes cooling" or "gives you cooling," and I agree with Hermione that we don't "apply" talcum powder.
     

    Hermione Golightly

    Senior Member
    British English
    Are you writing an ad for talcum powder? That would be a context. You <...> don't say who is talking to whom <...>

    Are Indian ads for talc the source of the OP sentence? Or is the OP sentence something you want to say to people you know in a personal chat?

    <...>

    I am sure that you are heavily exposed to Indian-English, "hinglish" as it's sometimes known. This differs in several important ways from standard modern native-speaker forms.
    No foreign language can be directly or literally translated into another. Each language has its own way of expressing an idea. That's what we call 'idiom'. (Sometimes the idioms are the same, which makes learning the language easier.)

    There are many ways of expressing the idea you want to express in the OP. I decided to keep it simple, in keeping with your level of English, with the aim of helping you.

    Also, we do not provide lists here. I can think of several ways of expressing the OP sentence correctly, properly and naturally, but that would be 'a list'.

    If you want translation, from Hindi or 'hinglish', this isn't a translation forum.

    <Edited by moderator (Florentia52) to remove off-topic comments>
     
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    velisarius

    Senior Member
    British English (Sussex)
    The fact that talcum has other uses doesn't mean that we (the consumer) normally talc:rolleyes: talk about "applying" it to our bodies.

    When I was younger, we used to powder our babies' bottoms with the stuff. My mother would use talcum powder after she'd had a bath. In neither case did I hear anyone say they were "applying tacum powder".
     

    Language Hound

    Senior Member
    American English
    There are talcum powders and baby powders that advertise their "cooling" effects.
    Since powder does absorb, if you apply it to sweaty skin, I imagine you might feel a cooling effect.
    The only time I really experienced a cooling effect was when I used a talcum powder that had menthol in it.
     

    Packard

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    The fact that talcum has other uses doesn't mean that we (the consumer) normally talc:rolleyes: talk about "applying" it to our bodies.

    When I was younger, we used to powder our babies' bottoms with the stuff. My mother would use talcum powder after she'd had a bath. In neither case did I hear anyone say they were "applying tacum powder".
    I think we are going to have to agree to disagree.

    Honey, please change the baby's diaper. And make sure you use talcum powder.

    Sweetheart, I just cleaned her and I'm applying the talc as we speak.
     

    Lun-14

    Banned
    Hindi
    When we use talcum powder, it gives a cooling sensation to our body.
    Is that now correct (with the addition of "sensation" to "cooling")?

    I'm amazed as to why "give" or "cause" isn't correct. It is really the talcum powder that gives/causes cooling when we use it. "Cooling" is an effect that is caused by the use of talcum powder.
     

    Lun-14

    Banned
    Hindi
    There are two things that are being discussed in this thread: the use of "give/cause" with "cooling" and the use of "apply" with "talcum powder".
    I'm not sure which one is the real topic of this thread. :(
     

    tittiugo

    Senior Member
    Italian-Italy
    Are you writing an ad for talcum powder? That would be a context. You repeatedly do not give contexts: you don't say who is talking to whom, for instance.

    Are Indian ads for talc the source of the OP sentence? Or is the OP sentence something you want to say to people you know in a personal chat?

    Are you really arguing with us about our advice? :eek:

    I am sure that you are heavily exposed to Indian-English, "hinglish" as it's sometimes known. This differs in several important ways from standard modern native-speaker forms.
    No foreign language can be directly or literally translated into another. Each language has its own way of expressing an idea. That's what we call 'idiom'. (Sometimes the idioms are the same, which makes learning the language easier.)

    There are many ways of expressing the idea you want to express in the OP. I decided to keep it simple, in keeping with your level of English, with the aim of helping you.

    Also, we do not provide lists here. I can think of several ways of expressing the OP sentence correctly, properly and naturally, but that would be 'a list'.

    If you want translation, from Hindi or 'hinglish', this isn't a translation forum.

    Please start a separate thread about the use of 'apply', after looking the word up here, WR dictionary, and elsewhere.

    Good Day all,

    I'm so sorry!...what's "ad"?
     

    Hermione Golightly

    Senior Member
    British English
    The 'real' topic is 'talcum powder gives cooling'.
    Using 'apply' for talcum powder was a secondary problem: both seem to have been addressed.

    I'm sure there are previous threads about 'apply', in general. Why not start one devoted to using 'apply'?
     

    Lun-14

    Banned
    Hindi
    You could possibly say "It gives me a cool feeling" but the suggestion in #13 is more natural.
    Don't you agree with my reasoning that "cooling" is the effect of using talcum powder. In other words, "talcum powder" is the cause while "cooling" is its effect. So we can say "Talcum powder gives/causes cooling"?
     

    Andygc

    Senior Member
    British English
    Don't you agree with my reasoning that "cooling" is the effect of using talcum powder. In other words, "talcum powder" is the cause while "cooling" is its effect. So we can say "Talcum powder gives/causes cooling"?
    1. Applying a layer of talcum powder to the skin causes no cooling whatsoever, unless the powder is at a temperature lower than skin temperature.
    2. Talcum powder is applied to damp skin to remove water - dampness from washing or sweating. It dries the skin.
    3. This removal of dampness may give a temporary sensation of cooling, but it is no more than an illusion.

    So we can say "Talcum powder gives/causes cooling"?
    Do you mean <So can we say "Talcum powder gives/causes cooling"?>?

    No.
     

    PaulQ

    Senior Member
    UK
    English - England
    When we use talcum powder, it gives a cooling sensation to our body.
    I simply do not see that. Talcum powder has an absorbent effect - it absorbs sweat - the evaporation of sweat causes cooling - if there is no sweat, there is no cooling effect.

    The drying effect is what produces the feeling of comfort - there is no "cooling".

    This is however, mainly a geographical observation: in countries that have intense heat (over 40o) and humidity (100%), there may be a sensation that is (inaccurately but colloquially) described as "cooling". However, I would not call it "cooling" in BE - read on!

    Is that now correct (with the addition of "sensation" to "cooling")?
    As I say, I would not use "cooling." I notice that Indian English uses "cooling" where BE would use "soothing".

    I'm amazed as to why "give" or "cause" isn't correct.
    It is a serious mistake to have pre-conceptions when learning another language.
    It is really the talcum powder that gives/causes cooling when we use it.
    No. See above.
    "Cooling" is an effect that is caused by the use of talcum powder.
    No, that meaning of the word "cooling" does not exist in BE.

    To cool - to lower the temperature. Cooling (adj.) - which has the effect of reducing the temperature.

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    PaulQ

    Senior Member
    UK
    English - England
    Could you give an example to show this, please?
    :D Are you joking?
    Talcum powder is cooling. :cross:
    Talcum powder is soothing.:tick:

    Just look at how Abcd123kkk has used it in the first post - wrongly and as a direct translation from the Hindi.
     

    PaulQ

    Senior Member
    UK
    English - England
    Is that what you wanted to say?
    Your ability to read my mind is not very good. :D

    Without any context, "Talcum powder gives soothing" is, fundamentally, wrong - and even with context, it is probably wrong. "Gives soothing" is not something that I can imagine being used.
    "Talcum powder is soothing" :thumbsup:

    <-----Reply to now-deleted post removed by moderator (Florentia52)----->
     
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    Andygc

    Senior Member
    British English
    Could we avoid using terms like "Hinglish"? It seems to me to be objectionable in a forum where speakers of Indian languages are seeking help to learn English. I also think it has no justification - there is no evidence in the forum that such a variant exists. Please could we just try to answer questions without using pejorative language?
     

    Packard

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    I agree with Paul. As with many other typically Indian English words, the reason is probably that whoever first wanted to use "soothing" probably didn't know the word, used "cooling" instead and it stuck.
    There might be more logic to it than that. If you have a sunburn and you apply the talcum powder, the "soothing" and the "cooling" become one.
     

    PaulQ

    Senior Member
    UK
    English - England
    There's some sense in that.

    I suspect it is connected with the word "inflammation" in which the "flam" suggests flames and hence "heat". Whereas in BE/AE, "inflammation" came to be associated with pain and swelling.
     

    Florentia52

    Modwoman in the attic
    English - United States
    The question about "gives cooling when we apply it" has been thoroughly addressed. Thanks to all who participated in the discussion. I'm closing this thread to avoid further topic drift.

    Florentia52, moderator
     
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