Talk the hind legs off a donkey

Artrella

Banned
BA
Spanish-Argentina
Hello! :)

Does anybody know the origin of this saying? I've been searching for it in Google but couldn't find it... any ideas? Thank you!
 
  • Artrella

    Banned
    BA
    Spanish-Argentina
    AverageJoe said:
    I've never heard it before, but it sounds like it means 'talks a lot'

    Yes Joe, that is correct. But I would like to know the origin of this idiom. Like the origin of the "donkey's year" (if you search for it you will find it, but I couldn't find the "hind legs...") :)
     

    lsp

    Senior Member
    NY
    US, English
    Artrella said:
    Yes Joe, that is correct. But I would like to know the origin of this idiom. Like the origin of the "donkey's year" (if you search for it you will find it, but I couldn't find the "hind legs...") :)
    I think more than just talking a lot. I don't know how it got started, but I believe it describes someone so persuasive that s/he could get a donkey that needs all 4 legs to stand and to walk, to give up its rear legs.
     

    irishstu

    Senior Member
    N.Ireland (Eng, Sp, Fr)
    I've also heard "Talk the leg(s) off a chair", which is bound to be related.

    Maybe you'll have better luck finding some info on that.
     

    Artrella

    Banned
    BA
    Spanish-Argentina
    irishstu said:
    I've also heard "Talk the leg(s) off a chair", which is bound to be related.

    Maybe you'll have better luck finding some info on that.

    Yes, you are right! When I was "googling" to find the origin of that phrase, I came across your phrase...but still need the origin of that... :rolleyes:

    Thank you everybody :thumbsup:
     

    Helicopta

    Senior Member
    England - English (Learning Spanish)
    Sorry I can't help you with the origin but I can tell you that it's quite a common phrase. My Dad uses it all the time in reference to my Mum!
     

    Artrella

    Banned
    BA
    Spanish-Argentina
    daviesri said:
    Here is a post that make sense. This must be a UK thing because I have never heard this before and all references I found seemed to originate from the UK.

    http://www.phrases.org.uk/bulletin_board/15/messages/710.html


    Thank you Daviesri!! I had seen that page before posting this question here... I was looking for something like the "Word Detective"... but no way!! :D

    Sorry I can't help you with the origin but I can tell you that it's quite a common phrase. My Dad uses it all the time in reference to my Mum!

    Thanks guys!! :) ;) :p

    :mad: men always say the same thing!!! ....aarrggghhhh!!!! :thumbsdown:
     

    scandalously in love

    Senior Member
    Canada - English
    awww.. this reminds me of Anne of Green Gables... (anybody read the book/seen the series?? :))

    Marilla says of Anne Shirley ..."She could talk the hind legs off of a mule!"

    It's quite amusing. And true. ;)
     

    la grive solitaire

    Senior Member
    United States, English
    scandalously in love said:
    awww.. this reminds me of Anne of Green Gables... (anybody read the book/seen the series?? :))
    Marilla says of Anne Shirley ... "She could talk the hind legs off of a mule!"It's quite amusing. And true. ;)
    Ta-da! :) http://greengables-1.tripod.com/sounds/
    garryknight said:
    I saw the Megan Follows film. A great actress. (OK, so I'm a big softie...:))
    (Me, too.) Megan Follows, Collen Dewhurst, Richard Farnsworth--the entire cast was superb, especially in part I, "Anne of Green Gables."
     

    scandalously in love

    Senior Member
    Canada - English
    awww... I fully concur about Megan Follows et al. :D

    A timeless Canadian classic.

    Thanks for the wonderful sound link!

    *walks off quoting Anne... There she weaves by night and day, a magic web with colours gay.......If you only call me Anne spelt with an E, I shall reconcile myself to not being called Cordelia..." ;)
     

    la grive solitaire

    Senior Member
    United States, English
    You're welcome--it is good, isn't it? The complete text of Tennyson's "The Lady of Shalott" is there at the end of the script for "part 1". I've always loved Anne's explanation of why she pretended to have lost Marilla's brooch: :)

    MARILLA: What ever made you say that you took it and lost it?

    ANNE: You said you'd keep me in my room until I confessed. I just thought up a good confession and made it as interesting as I could.

    MARILLA: But it was still a lie.

    ANNE: You wouldn't believe the truth.

     

    PaulQ

    Banned
    UK
    English - England
    It means to persuade someone to part with something. The "off" = from

    To talk something off someone is not commonly used other than in this phrase - we would now say "to talk someone out of something."

    A: "You do not look happy, what happened?"
    B: "A man came to my house and talked me out of £500 to repair the roof. He pulled some tiles off the roof and then left. That was a month ago. I think I've lost my money."

    Talk the hind legs off a donkey - verbally persuade the donkey to part with its hind legs.
     
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