talk turkey

bepleased

Banned
Chinese
Hi,
I need for your help to tell me it is correct or not that the prototype and meanings of "talk turkey" that I got to the alleged story as bellow.

Thank for your help.

(of me) "talk turkey to me." ---you are ready to talk, so as turkey come to me. ----If you want to talk to me --- the verb "talk" means you want to produce / use words to come to me / or to use words so as to come to me, and the words you want to talk to me that is turkey.

(the alleged story) Speak plainly, get to the point, as in Don't call me until you're ready to talk turkey. This expression allegedly comes from a tale about an Indian and a white man who hunted together and divided the game. When the white man said, "I'll take the turkey and you the buzzard, or you take the buzzard and I the turkey," the Indian replied, "Talk turkey to me." Whether or not this tale had a true basis, the term was recorded in its present meaning by about 1840.

http://www.answers.com/topic/talk-turkey
 
  • Copyright

    Senior Member
    American English
    (of me) "talk turkey to me." ---you are ready to talk, so as turkey come to me. ----If you want to talk to me --- the verb "talk" means you want to produce / use words to come to me / or to use words so as to come to me, and the words you want to talk to me that is turkey.
    I believe your desire to make literal sense of idioms only creates more confusion for you. No one is waddling up to you like a turkey in order to talk. You can look up the etymology of an idiom (and the Indian story may or may not be true) but in the end there is some practical value to simply memorizing the accepted meaning of the idiom rather than dissecting it into its component parts.

    Talk turkey: to discuss a problem seriously with the intention of solving it
     

    Copyright

    Senior Member
    American English
    Hi,
    I need for your help to tell me it is correct or not that the prototype and meanings of "talk turkey" that I got to the alleged story as bellow.
    Parla's link to three possible stories begins with this disclaimer: I’ve found three stories about this, none of them wholly convincing.

    I think that pretty much covers the believability aspect of the question.
     

    entangledbank

    Senior Member
    English - South-East England
    Michael Quinion of World Wide Words (the website cited above) is the best expert on how such expressions arise. If he has only found those three possibilities, those are the only reasonable options.
     

    PaulQ

    Banned
    UK
    English - England
    Well, the country always has a capital T and the word in the expression never has a capital T - so that is a clue as to what is meant by "turkey." The reason that the bird is called a turkey is long and complicated and it involves several mistakes made by the people who found, named, and imported the bird from Africa.

    If you look back at #3 and follow this link: World Wide Words: Talk turkey You will discover the origin.
     

    velisarius

    Senior Member
    British English (Sussex)
    The turkey is a noble bird, and in 19th-century North America the term “turkey” was often used figuratively in colloquial expressions that were generally positive.

    For instance, to “talk turkey,” an expression first recorded in 1824, means to speak openly or frankly.
    Let’s talk turkey



    I'm not sure I buy that explanation either. Turkeys are very vocal birds, and it's quite amusing to speculate what they are grumbling about. I always thought they sound like a Greek chorus in a tragedy, commenting on the action.

    Perhaps 19th century Americans just liked the sound of the phrase.
     

    kentix

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    Wild turkeys are native to North America. The name might not be, but the bird in question is.
    wild turkey - Google Search

    So although there might be a connection with the name given to the North American bird, the concept covered by the phrase was apparently native to the colonists in their new North American environment.
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top