Tamil: தேவதூதன்

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Au101

Senior Member
England, English (UK)
I was looking for the word "angel" in Tamil, and I read that "தேவதூதன்" is the translation, however, I am not sure if this is accurate and was wondering if anybody could confirm. Thanks.
 
  • Au101

    Senior Member
    England, English (UK)
    Yes, of course sorry. Now, there are of course many many transliteration schemes for Tamil, so:

    thEvathUthan
    theevathuuthan
    thEvathuuthan
    theavathoothan

    I'm sorry but there are just so many and it's easy to get confused, but I think it sounds:

    tay-va-doo-dun (although my pronunciation is really bad, so that would need confirmation)
     

    palomnik

    Senior Member
    English
    That's what my dictionary says, with one slight difference - தேவதூதர். The different spelling at the end is just an honorific difference, however.

    It's interesting to note that the first half of the word comes from Sanskrit deva, so I guess the best transliteration is devaduudar.
     

    panjabigator

    Senior Member
    Am. English
    I was expecting a Sanskritic word here, but I was confused when I saw "theva" instead of "deva." Should of known to recognize this; is this a common phonetic shift in Tamil?
     

    palomnik

    Senior Member
    English
    I was expecting a Sanskritic word here, but I was confused when I saw "theva" instead of "deva." Should of known to recognize this; is this a common phonetic shift in Tamil?
    Greetings, Gator!

    Tamil has a lot less consonantal sounds than northern Indian languages do. The symbol த is pronounced like a dental t (i.e., a Hindi त) at the beginning of a word or when it's doubled in the middle of a word, like a dental d after an n in the middle of a word (i.e., a Hindi द्), and like English th in this when it occurs alone in the middle of a word. Also, Tamil has no aspirated consonants.

    As a result Tamil often can't distinguish त्, थ्, द् and ध् in borrowings from Sanskrit. One Tamil acquaintance I have is named Sandy. I wondered about that until I finally realized that her name is actually Shanti!
     

    Au101

    Senior Member
    England, English (UK)
    Thank you very much Palomnik, but could I just ask what you mean by "an honorific difference"? I was just wondering which one to go with, தேவதூதர் or தேவதூதன்? Thank you very much :)
     

    palomnik

    Senior Member
    English
    Thank you very much Palomnik, but could I just ask what you mean by "an honorific difference"? I was just wondering which one to go with, தேவதூதர் or தேவதூதன்? Thank you very much :)
    தேவதூதன் is "neutral" - it might be what an angel would call him/herself, or what you might use if you were writing about angels, say, in an encyclopedia article.

    தேவதூதர் is "polite" - it's how you would address an angel if you were talking to one, or you were (respectfully) referring to one.
     

    doubidoo

    Member
    Tagalog, French
    Greetings, Gator!

    Tamil has a lot less consonantal sounds than northern Indian languages do. The symbol த is pronounced like a dental t (i.e., a Hindi त) at the beginning of a word or when it's doubled in the middle of a word, like a dental d after an n in the middle of a word (i.e., a Hindi द्), and like English th in this when it occurs alone in the middle of a word. Also, Tamil has no aspirated consonants.

    As a result Tamil often can't distinguish त्, थ्, द् and ध् in borrowings from Sanskrit. One Tamil acquaintance I have is named Sandy. I wondered about that until I finally realized that her name is actually Shanti!
    I'm answering a bit late.
    But actually Indian Tamils keep the Sanskrit pronunciation "normally".
    So you say deva instead of teva or bayam instead of payam.

    But some Indian Tamil dialects and ALMOST all Sri Lankan Tamils pronounce it "purely" in Tamil.
    So they say teva instead of deva and so on...

    However, in India it is better to use the Sanskrit pronunciation whereas in Sri Lanka, the Tamil one.
     
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