taste - sense

rosagg

Senior Member
Español - España
Hello everybody,

I just have learned that sense verbs can be followed by object + ing or object + infinitive, but I can't find any example with the verb taste.

Please, could anybody help me?

Thank you.
 
  • xqby

    Senior Member
    English (U.S.)
    You mean like "I see him running."?
    You could say: "I want you to taste my cake to see if I made it correctly." but I can't think of an example that uses the "-ing" suffix.
     

    Forero

    Senior Member
    I believe taste and smell are never used with the meaning of "witness", so we would not use an infinitive in such a construction:

    I saw/heard/felt butter coming out of the cookies. [My eyes/ears/tactile sense told me it was coming out.]
    I saw/heard/felt butter come out of the cookies. [My eyes/ears/tactile sense bore witness to its coming out.]
    I saw/heard/felt the cookies burn. [My senses bore witness to their burning/being burned.]

    I tasted/smelled butter coming out of the cookies.
    [I knew, by other means, that it was coming out, and as it came out I tasted/smelled it.]
    I tasted/smelled butter come out of the cookies. :cross:
    I tasted/smelled the cookies burn. :cross:

    It seems that the sense of taste and the sense of smell do not give us enough accurate information to serve as witnesses to actions.
     

    Na'ilah

    Senior Member
    USA English
    I believe taste and smell are never used with the meaning of "witness", so we would not use an infinitive in such a construction:

    I saw/heard/felt butter coming out of the cookies. [My eyes/ears/tactile sense told me it was coming out.]
    I saw/heard/felt butter come out of the cookies. [My eyes/ears/tactile sense bore witness to its coming out.]
    I saw/heard/felt the cookies burn. [My senses bore witness to their burning/being burned.]

    I tasted/smelled butter coming out of the cookies.
    [I knew, by other means, that it was coming out, and as it came out I tasted/smelled it.]
    I tasted/smelled butter come out of the cookies. :cross:
    I tasted/smelled the cookies burn. :cross:

    It seems that the sense of taste and the sense of smell do not give us enough accurate information to serve as witnesses to actions.
    Better late than never... I totally disagree with this.

    I saw/heard/felt the cookies burn. [My senses bore witness to their burning/being burned.] This is just weird (and incorrect in the last two cases). Anyone who has baked cookies and burnt them (I am an old pro--never baked any without burning them). You cannot hear or feel the cookies burning. And you could only see them if you had your head in front of the oven for some extended period of time.

    What you should say is:

    I smelled the cookies burning. :tick:

    As for butter coming out of cookies... I don't even know what that means.
     

    Na'ilah

    Senior Member
    USA English
    As for tasting and smelling here are two examples:

    We spent the afternoon tasting various wines and cheeses from the region.

    And

    The dog would not stop smelling the spot on the floor.
     

    Agró

    Senior Member
    Spanish-Navarre
    As for tasting and smelling here are two examples:

    We spent the afternoon tasting various wines and cheeses from the region.

    And

    The dog would not stop smelling the spot on the floor.
    Na'ilah, where's the infitive or the -ing form after taste?

    I tasted the wine coming down my throat.
    Would that work?
     

    Na'ilah

    Senior Member
    USA English
    Is that what the question meant? I didn't realize, but yes, good example.

    Taste/Smell + object + verb (infinitive)
    Taste/Smell + object + verb (-ing)

    I tasted the flavors of fruit linger in my palate.
    I tasted the flavors of fruit lingering in my palate.
    or you could even say
    I tasted lingering flavors of fruit in my palate

    I smelled the cookies burn in the oven
    I smelled the cookies burning in the oven
    or
    I smelled burning cookies in the oven.
     

    owlman5

    Senior Member
    English-US
    I tasted strong whiskey burn/burning in my mouth. (I'd use "burning" here: "burn" sounds a little strained.

    I could taste a strange substance run/running down my throat.

    I could taste something weird ooze/oozing over my lips/tongue. (Yuck!)
     

    Forero

    Senior Member
    I saw/heard/felt the cookies burn. [My senses bore witness to their burning/being burned.] This is just weird (and incorrect in the last two cases). Anyone who has baked cookies and burnt them (I am an old pro--never baked any without burning them). You cannot hear or feel the cookies burning. And you could only see them if you had your head in front of the oven for some extended period of time.
    I have seen cookies change from golden brown to charcoal, and I have heard the sizzling stop when the last of the liquid evaporates, so I say that I have seen and heard cookies burn. I don't think it is necessarily impossible to feel cookies burn, though the usual oven setup apparently does not allow it.

    But I have trouble understanding "smell something burn", because I don't think we smell the change itself, at least not in a way that we can know by smelling just when it was that the change happened. We can see, hear, or feel when a change happens, but smell seems to be different.

    Taste is similar to smell, but with a difference: we can taste, for example, when starch turns to sugar, but we still don't say "I tasted it turn to sugar." I suppose we actually taste the sugar but not the change to sugar.

    In other words:

    see something happen :tick:
    hear something happen :tick:
    feel something happen :tick:
    taste something happen :cross:
    smell something happen :cross:

     

    owlman5

    Senior Member
    English-US
    Hi, Forero. I suppose technically you're right: You smell smoke (the by-product of burning) rather than the burning itself. However, language is frequently unreasonable and it sounds perfectly natural to say: I smell something burning.

    I admit it's a bit of a stretch to say something like "I tasted something burning." Fortunately for the English language, poets frequently make stretches like this. I think our language is enriched thereby.
     

    Forero

    Senior Member
    Hi, Forero. I suppose technically you're right: You smell smoke (the by-product of burning) rather than the burning itself. However, language is frequently unreasonable and it sounds perfectly natural to say: I smell something burning.
    "I smell something burning" means that I smell the odor characteristic of burning things and thus have come to know that something must be burning, or must recently have been burning.

    And "I smelled the cookies burning" means that I smell the characteristic odor of burning cookies and have come to know that the cookies must be burning.

    But "I smelled the cookies burn in the oven" sounds odd (to me today) because I would be hard pressed to ascertain by my sense of smell alone when the cookies made the change from "not burning" to "burning", or from "burning" to "having burned".

    Unlike our senses of sight, hearing, and various "feelings", our sense of smell is not specific and timely enough to allow us to identify these momentary changes of state as they occur.

    "We smelled that the cookies had burned" makes sense, but that is not the same, being after the fact.
    I admit it's a bit of a stretch to say something like "I tasted something burning." Fortunately for the English language, poets frequently make stretches like this. I think our language is enriched thereby.
    Common usage already has "feeling" for both psychological and metaphysical "senses". Psychological feelings can be independent of objective reality, and metaphysical feelings are of course limitless.

    It does make sense for food to have a taste that comes only from being near something else that was burning, so "I taste something burning" almost makes sense. Still "I tasted something burn" is weird, even to my imagination.

    But consider gustar, from the Latin verb for "taste", and saber, which was ambiguous in Latin too. Remember it's not tuna with good taste but tuna that tastes good. Poets certainly have food for thought here.
     

    Na'ilah

    Senior Member
    USA English
    Burning is a process and you smell it when it occurs, once the process has ended you are left with coals or ashes or something of the sort and they do not smell of something burning.

    We may just have to agree to disagree here.

    Saludos :)
     
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