tasty/delicious water

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meijin

Senior Member
Japanese
Hi, I've read the following thread in the past and read it again now, and I think I understand the difference between "tasty" and "delicious" panjandrum explained. If my understanding is correct, I can say, even if the dish doesn't suit my palate, "This is a tasty dish" if I think it has a taste that many people probably like.
Delicious vs tasty

If so, I'm wondering if it's applicable to water as well (and also white rice, etc.). Does water have a definite taste which makes one say "This is tasty?" Is there a bottled water that you find tasty? I used to drink bottled water every day and sometimes found it delicious, maybe because I was very thirsty at that time.
 
  • Juhasz

    Senior Member
    English - United States
    I don't think I agree with panjandrum about the difference between those words. Like the other Americans who posted in that thread, I consider delicious to be more formal and more emphatic than tasty, but both words are equally subjective. I would find it very odd if someone said, "This is a really tasty dish, but I don't like it at all."

    I rarely use either word, but if I did, I don't see why I wouldn't apply them to water. Although, I've never had water that tasted good enough to be called delicious.
     

    Sparky Malarky

    Moderator
    English - US
    Tasty means it tastes good. Delicious means it tastes extremely good. I would not call something tasty if I didn't like it, though I might say something like "I don't care for the curry there, but many people find it tasty" or "Most people say his barbecue is tasty, but I don't like it myself."

    However, you could substitute "good" or "delicious" in these sentences.

    But "tasty" also means "a lot of flavor." You don't want water to have a lot of flavor. I would not call it "tasty." However, if I was really thirsty, I might call it "delicious."
     

    meijin

    Senior Member
    Japanese
    I wouldn't refer to water as either 'tasty' or 'delicious'. If anything I might say, This water is very nice!/I love the taste of this water!
    Although, I've never had water that tasted good enough to be called delicious.
    I would not call it "tasty." However, if I was really thirsty, I might call it "delicious."
    So, if you drank spring water in some mountain which tastes sweet (it tastes sweet, doesn't it?), you would say "It's sweet!" (or "It's nice!" or "I love the taste of this water!") and probably "It's delicious!" too, but not "It's tasty!"?
    We (Japanese) would be very likely to say "It's sweet and xxxxx (an adjective to mean "delicious" or "tasty")!", and it might be because we are exhausted and thirsty after climbing the mountain (in which case it's "delicious"), and also because the water tastes sweet (in which case it's "tasty").

    but it can't be tasty unless it has a particular flavor (as with flavored water).
    I agree (except that I find the spring water in the mountains tasty, just because it's sweet). I've never felt the same sweetness in bottled waters although they are supposed to have come from the mountains....
    As for flavored water, I've actually been translating a document about it and that's why I wondered if unflavored water should be described as "tasty".
     

    Juhasz

    Senior Member
    English - United States
    If I drank that spring water, I might say, "That tastes great!"

    I already mentioned that I, personally, don't use "tasty," except maybe when speaking to children. Somehow the word sounds childish to me. I may be alone in that sentiment, but I do wonder if those posters who said "tasty" should not be used for water would use "tasty" to describe other things. Would Glen or Sparky say, "That cake is tasty"?

    I get the feeling that this word is not used very much by American adults, which renders the question of whether water can be "tasty" moot.
     

    Glenfarclas

    Senior Member
    English (American)
    I already mentioned that I, personally, don't use "tasty," except maybe when speaking to children. Somehow the word sounds childish to me. I may be alone in that sentiment, but I do wonder if those posters who said "tasty" should not be used for water would use "tasty" to describe other things. Would Glen or Sparky say, "That cake is tasty"?
    I use the word in a somewhat lighthearted way. If a waiter asks me how I like the confit of duck I'm eating, I won't call it tasty; but if a friend asks me to sample some spaghetti sauce she's got going on the stove, then I might well. I guess I consider the word more informal than childish.
     
    I also can't imagine referring to water (or any other thin liquid) as "tasty" but might in fact say "this water tastes good."

    (And it's negative, "this water tastes bad")

    "Delicious" I confine to chomp- in -your- mouth- and- bite- down- on- with- your- teeth food.:)

    This might be a matter of common collocation of expressions.

    On a related alternative, I'd be much more inclined to say "This water is (very) refreshing."

    (It's instantly quenching my thirst and supplying a nice mouth-feel. )
     

    andrewg927

    Senior Member
    English - American
    I would totally say "This water is refreshing". I can't imagine saying "tasty" to refer to water in any case. I don't find "tasty" childish at all.
     
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