Tatar: килерме

alevtinka

Senior Member
Chinese (Mandarin)
Where does "килерме" come from ? I know "килер" is the indefinite future tense or participle of the verb "kilerga - to come, arrive", but what's the grammatical sense of "kilerme" ?

The negative for "kiler" seems to be "kilerma's" ....
 
  • ancalimon

    Senior Member
    Turkish
    "gel" is "come" in Turkish. "gelme" is "the act of coming" in Turkish. "gelmek" is "to come" in Turkish.

    "come" is "kilü" in Tatar.
     

    Rallino

    Moderatoúrkos
    Turkish
    Yes, if 'me' is stressed, it's a verbal noun. If the previous syllable is stressed, then it's the negative imperative.

    Gelme - the act of coming.

    Gelme - don't come.

    This is in Turkish, though. I'm not sure about Tatar.
     

    alevtinka

    Senior Member
    Chinese (Mandarin)
    Yes, if 'me' is stressed, it's a verbal noun. If the previous syllable is stressed, then it's the negative imperative.

    Gelme - the act of coming.

    Gelme - don't come.

    This is in Turkish, though. I'm not sure about Tatar.
    [Gel] is spelt as [kil] in Tatar, and the negative stem of this verb is [kilma']. "-me" part is stressed, I think it works as a verbal noun )
     

    ancalimon

    Senior Member
    Turkish
    on a further note, I think the root of Gel (Kil) is GE (Ki).

    Ge + OL = GEL

    GE: to come, to go, to get to (just like PIE "GWA" meaning to come, to go)

    OL: to become

    GEL: to become someone who comes.

    But it's a bit different when you say GİT (go)

    GE: to go
    ET: to do, to make

    GEET>GİT: do the act of going
     
    Last edited:

    alevtinka

    Senior Member
    Chinese (Mandarin)
    Ah, I remembered one thing, but I'm not sure about it.

    [-me] or [-my] is also used somehow to begin a question ?

    e.g.

    Bu xa'ref(me) ? Juk, bu xa'ref tu'gel.

    Is this a letter ? No, this is not a letter.

    so, [ kiler(me) ] may be used in an interrogative sentence ?
     
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