-te kureru / morau; くれる / もらう

Cereth

Senior Member
Español
Yamada-san!!! This Lesson was great to me!!!!!!!

Still it´s difficult to distinguish the ocassions when I have to add "kuremashita/kureta" is it always used when "someone" did a Favor to you and that is the way to say you are grateful?

Can you please give more examples with "kureta"
because right now I only can add it after verb "oshieru":

Example: Saitou-san ga Nihongo wo oshiete kureta.


Gracias


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  • cheshire

    Senior Member
    Catholic (Cat-holic, not Catholic)
    Still it´s difficult to distinguish the ocassions when I have to add "kuremashita/kureta" is it always used when "someone" did a Favor to you and that is the way to say you are grateful?
    Yes, you're right.
    Can you please give more examples with "kureta"
    because right now I only can add it after verb "oshieru":
    Sure.

    先生が本を買ってくれた sensei ga hon wo katte kureta/ My teacher bought me a book.

    兄さんが動物園へ連れて行ってくれた。 niisan ga doubutsuen e tsureteitte kureta/ My brother took me to the zoo.

    姉さんがこの仕事をしてくれた。 neesan ga kono shigoto wo shite kureta./ My sister did this job for me.

    夫が皿を洗ってくれた。 My husband washed dishes for me.
     

    Flaminius

    coclea mod
    日本語 / japāniski / יפנית
    Is it always used when "someone" did a Favor to you and that is the way to say you are grateful?
    It does not always indicate that you are grateful or feeling indebted. Expressing an action done by someone for the speaker without -te kureru is very difficult.

    ?先生が私に本を買った。
    This sentence sounds odd, perhaps excepting soliloquy such as in diary. Here watashi, the speaker, is treated as someone other than the speaker. Without -te kureru, the sentence is a remark based on an outside-looking-in framework in which the speaker sees the actors and actions as a neutral observer. Unless the action is seen in a negative light, "Someone does something to me" is expressed in this construction.
     

    yamada

    Member
    japan and japanese
    In addition to 'kureru' (the past tense form: kureta) there is another helper auxiliary verb 'morau' (the past tense form: moratta)
    with a giving and receiving meaning to express an act where an agent does something for the benifit of somebody else.
    a) A ga +<B ni, B no tameni etc.>+V-te or V-de+kureru. (present tense)
    b) <B wa> +A ni+ V-te or V-de+morau. (present tense) 
    A: an agent of an act, B: a benefactive of an act, V-te or V-de: te-form or de-form of a verb. < >: optional.
    The verb conjugates to a te-form or a de-form according to whether the verb ends with '-te' or '-de' in the past tense form. For example:
    taberu(eat) → tabeta(ate) → tabete kureru
    okuru(send) → okutta(sent) → okutte kureru
    asobu(play) → asonda(played) → asonde kureru
    yomu(read) → yonda(read) → yonde kureru

    →Mr. Suzuki sent me an english book (for my benefit).
    1)Suzuki san ga watashi ni eigo no hon wo okutte kureru. (鈴木さんが、私に、英語の本を送ってくれた。)
    2)watashi wa Suzuki san ni eigo no hon wo okutte moratta.(私は、鈴木さんに、本を送ってもらった。)

    →As Mr.Yamamoto came by car (for me), I arrived at the station earlier.
    3)Yamamoto san ga kuruma de kite kureta node, eki ni hayameni tsuita.(山本さんが、車で来てくれたので、駅に早めに着いた。)
    4)Yamamoto san ni kuruma de kite moratta node, eki ni hayameni tsuita.(山本さんに、車で来てもらったので、駅に早めに着いた。)

    You can also use 'kureru' for an agent of an inanimate noun, but 'morau' cannot be applied in this case.
    →Finally winter has come, and we can go skiing (thankfully).
    5)○Youyaku huyu ga kite kureta node, sukii ni dekakerareru.
    (ようやく、冬が来てくれたので、スキーに出かけられる。)
    6)×Youyaku huyu ni kite moratta node, sukii ni dekakerareru.
    (ようやく、冬に来てもらったので、スキーに出かけられる。)

    You should be careful, when you thank for something:
    →Thank you very much for your buying a beer for me.
    7)○ biiru wo ippai ogotte kurete doumo arigatou. (ビールを一杯、おごってくれて、どうもありがとう。)
    8)× biiru wo ippai ogotte moratte doumo arigatou. (ビールを一杯、おごってもらって、どうもありがとう。)

    9)× biiru wo ippai ogotte kurete doumo sumimasen. (ビールを一杯、おごってくれて、どうもすみません。)
    10)○biiru wo ippai ogotte moratte doumo sumimasen. (ビールを一杯、おごってもらって、どうもすみません。)

    'kureru' is also used to blame an agent of an act strongly for doing an unfavorable act.
    In such a case a sentence ends usually with a particle 'na' or 'ne' so that you express yourself harder.
    →Hey, you, how could you break my car!?
    11)oi, omae, yokumo ore no kuruma wo kowashite kureta na.
    (おい、おまえ、よくも俺の車を壊してくれたな。)
    In addition, the first person can be an agent:
    →I'll beat the hell out of you.
    12)omae wo itaime ni awasete kureru.
    (おまえを痛い目にあわせてくれる。)

    'morau' can be followed by 'te wa komaru' for pointing out an unfavorable act too.
    →Do not park the car by the fire plag.
    (literally:parking the car by the fire plag would annoy people.)
    13)shookasen no sugu soba de chuusha shite moratte wa komarimasu.
    (消火栓のすぐそばで、駐車してもらっては、困ります。)
     

    Flaminius

    coclea mod
    日本語 / japāniski / יפנית
    For understanding benefactive expressions such as kureru and morau, two factors are to be kept in mind; focus and the subject of the main clause.


    A ---> B
      O


    The scheme above is to be read; A does an Operation for/to/in place of/etc. B. In other words, A is the agent and B the patient, of O. By focus I mean that the focused noun should be the subject or the topic of a benefactive construction (hereafter the focus is expressed by highlighting the noun).

    kureru:
    A ---> B
    The verb kureru focuses on the agent noun.
    12)omae wo itaime ni awasete kureru.
    (おまえを痛い目にあわせてくれる。)
    When the speaker is the focused noun, however implicitly, the sentence bears sarcastic implications (I shall benevolently do this harmful thing to you).

    morau:
    A ---> B
    The verb morau focuses on the patient noun.
    If the agent noun A is an inanimate noun, morau-construction is very tenuous. Syntactically, having the patient noun as the subject is already tenuous. Since an inanimate agent is another tenuous factor, a sentence combining the two is too overburdened with difficulties to actually be used.


    Depending on the verb in the main clause, the subjects of the subordinate benefactive clause and the main clause should be the same. This should be considered when the benefactive expression is joined to the main clause by te-form.

    6)×Youyaku huyu ni kite moratta node, sukii ni dekakerareru.
    (ようやく、冬に来てもらったので、スキーに出かけられる。)
    You should be careful, when you thank for something:
    →Thank you very much for your buying a beer for me.
    7)○ biiru wo ippai ogotte kurete doumo arigatou. (ビールを一杯、おごってくれて、どうもありがとう。)
    8)× biiru wo ippai ogotte moratte doumo arigatou. (ビールを一杯、おごってもらって、どうもありがとう。)

    9)× biiru wo ippai ogotte kurete doumo sumimasen. (ビールを一杯、おごってくれて、どうもすみません。)
    10)○biiru wo ippai ogotte moratte doumo sumimasen. (ビールを一杯、おごってもらって、どうもすみません。)
    Both ありがとう and すみません have "same-subject constraint." The implicit subject of ありがとう is the hearer. That of すみません is the speaker.
     
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