te quiero, me gusta (pronoun)

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Lilac Honeybee

New Member
English
Hola!! Tengo una pregunta rápida! I get really confused with pronouns.
- Te quiero -> I love you (the 'te' represents you and the 'o' conjugation represents I)
- Me gusta -> I like it (the 'a' conjugation represents (he/she/it/usted) and the 'me' represents I)

Why is it that in one example the first pronoun represents the second word te = you but in the other me = I.

I hope this makes sense!!
 
  • TheCrociato91

    Senior Member
    Italian - Northern Italy
    Hello and welcome to the forums.

    In Spanish, the word order is much freer than in English, so you shouldn't focus on the order in which the elements appear. You should focus on their meaning and grammatical function.

    (Yo) te quiero = literally: I you love
    (Él/Ella, etc.) me (= a mí) gusta = literally: he/she, etc. to me appeals.

    It's two different constructions. In the first one, the person that loves is the subject and the person being loved is the direct object (same as in the English "I love you"). In the second one, the person that likes is the indirect object and the person being liked is the subject (different from the English "I like it").
     
    Last edited:

    Teacher Lalo

    Member
    Español - México
    Yeah like TheCrociato91 says, it's a different way of speaking. Me gusta would be like "to me it appeals" or "he/she/it I like" (el/ella/eso me gusta)
     

    MonsieurGonzalito

    Senior Member
    Castellano de Argentina
    With "gustar" in Spanish, the action is "emitted" by the thing liked, and the agent "doing the liking" is the object of the sentence.
    Similar to English "to please".

    Eso me gusta.
    This pleases me.
     

    anahiseri

    Senior Member
    Spanish (Spain) and German (Germany)
    With "gustar" in Spanish, the action is "emitted" by the thing liked, and the agent "doing the liking" is the object of the sentence.
    Similar to English "to please".

    Eso me gusta.
    This pleases me.
    I think this is a good explanation. some examples with other pronouns to make it clearer:
    I love him = (Yo) lo quiero. I love her =( Yo) la quiero. You can omit the subject.
    lo, la are direct object pronouns. Indirect is le both for him and her.
    I like him = He pleases me = (él) me gusta.
    I like her = She pleases me = (ella) me gusta.
     

    TheCrociato91

    Senior Member
    Italian - Northern Italy
    The difference is that the English "to please (someone)" takes a direct object, whereas the Spanish "gustar (a alguien)" takes an indirect object, hence why I chose the verb "appeal (to someone)", which like "gustar (a alguien)" takes an indirect object.
     

    Lilac Honeybee

    New Member
    English
    Hello and welcome to the forums.

    In Spanish, the word order is much freer than in English, so you shouldn't focus on the order in which the elements appear. You should focus on their meaning and grammatical function.

    (Yo) te quiero = literally: I you love
    (Él/Ella, etc.) me (= a mí) gusta = literally: he/she, etc. to me appeals.

    It's two different constructions. In the first one, the person that loves is the subject and the person being loved is the direct object (same as in the English "I love you"). In the second one, the person that likes is the indirect object and the person being liked is the subject (different from the English "I like it").
    Thanks a million!! I get super confused with direct and indirect pronouns is there a good way to remember which is which. I sometimes think too deeply and get muddled up!
     

    MonsieurGonzalito

    Senior Member
    Castellano de Argentina
    The difference is that the English "to please (someone)" takes a direct object, whereas the Spanish "gustar (a alguien)" takes an indirect object, hence why I chose the verb "appeal (to someone)", which like "gustar (a alguien)" takes an indirect object.
    This is true, I haven't thought about it.

    A website I just read tries to bridge this difference proposing: "to be pleasing to " ...
     

    S.V.

    Senior Member
    Español, México
    You can try to remember it's always like disgust. You disgust me! Where me is the receiving end. Not the subject like I love you.

    Though you gust me! means nothing in English, of course. But that's it in Spanish. Tacos disgust me, *Tacos gust me (tacos = subject).
     

    Teacher Lalo

    Member
    Español - México
    Thanks a million!! I get super confused with direct and indirect pronouns is there a good way to remember which is which. I sometimes think too deeply and get muddled up!

    Best way to remember is to practice 😁
    Could you give another one or two examples that confuse you? To maybe suggest something else to remember or practice.
     

    Lilac Honeybee

    New Member
    English
    Best way to remember is to practice 😁
    Could you give another one or two examples that confuse you? To maybe suggest something else to remember or practice.
    I just never know when to use an indirect pronoun or a direct pronoun- generally when speaking or writing. It doesn't come naturally yet.
    For example:
    - Lo siento uses a indirect pronoun but Me harto de la escuela doesn't.
    - Ella se lo envio really confuses me, because without deep thought I can't identify the indirect/ direct pronoun.

    I don't know when its appropriate to use the different pronouns. I hope this makes sense, when I get confused I over complicate everything and don't effectively convey my questions!
     

    Teacher Lalo

    Member
    Español - México
    I just never know when to use an indirect pronoun or a direct pronoun- generally when speaking or writing. It doesn't come naturally yet.
    For example:
    - Lo siento uses a indirect pronoun but Me harto de la escuela doesn't.
    - Ella se lo envio really confuses me, because without deep thought I can't identify the indirect/ direct pronoun.

    I don't know when its appropriate to use the different pronouns. I hope this makes sense, when I get confused I over complicate everything and don't effectively convey my questions!
    I see, yeah I can see how it's confusing, it's similar for Spanish speakers with the object pronouns.

    My best suggestion would be to make/write sentences, at least every other day, for 5-10 minutes. In English then Spanish. Like the one you said "Ella se lo envió", "she sent it to him/her"
    Lo siento is more of an expression, don't try to understand it too deeply.
    When you say "lo/la" + verb, you don't mention the object, you already know what you're talking about. Viste la película? Si la ví. Leíste el libro? No lo leí.
    La preparé en la estufa (I prepared it on the stove)
    Viste mis zapatos? No los ví (I didn't see them)

    I hope that helps. I haven't ever really taught Spanish formally, as I have English, so I don't know most of the gramatical terms in Spanish.

    Do you have someone that can help you check your sentences if you decide to write some down to practice?
     

    Coffeemachtspass

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    I get super confused with direct and indirect pronouns is there a good way to remember which is which.
    Hi,
    Here are some general principles that will get you through. Little by little, you can refine your knowledge of the peculiarities in the usage and the differences between Spanish and English habits. If it comforts you, you should know that even the Spanish-speaking world doesn't agree all the time on which one to use.

    The direct object literally implies that the verb action is done directly to some noun (a person, a thing, even a concept). All of these direct objects could be represented by direct object pronouns. A significant quirk in Spanish is that if the direct object is a specific person, you must use 'a' before that noun (and this creates confusion between direct and indirect objects representing people).

    I see the table. Veo la mesa. La veo.
    I see the confusion. Veo la confusión. La veo.
    I see the student. Veo a la estudiante. La veo.

    The indirect object implies that some action is done to or for someone (yes, usually a person, although it could be some other type of noun). This person benefits or loses from the verb action, but this is not being done directly to him or her. The indirect object is always preceded by the preposition 'a' in Spanish (which creates some confusion with the 'personal a' that I mentioned above).

    We give money to the poor. Damos dinero a los pobres. Les demos dinero.
    The salad is pleasing to us. La ensalada gusta a nosotros. La ensalada nos gusta. [Now do you see the answer to your original question? The salad is doing the action of pleasing to us. In other words, the salad gives pleasure to us (indirect object).]
     

    Lilac Honeybee

    New Member
    English
    I see, yeah I can see how it's confusing, it's similar for Spanish speakers with the object pronouns.

    My best suggestion would be to make/write sentences, at least every other day, for 5-10 minutes. In English then Spanish. Like the one you said "Ella se lo envió", "she sent it to him/her"
    Lo siento is more of an expression, don't try to understand it too deeply.
    When you say "lo/la" + verb, you don't mention the object, you already know what you're talking about. Viste la película? Si la ví. Leíste el libro? No lo leí.
    La preparé en la estufa (I prepared it on the stove)
    Viste mis zapatos? No los ví (I didn't see them)

    I hope that helps. I haven't ever really taught Spanish formally, as I have English, so I don't know most of the gramatical terms in Spanish.

    Do you have someone that can help you check your sentences if you decide to write some down to practice?
    That makes sense, so you' mainly use lo/la when answering questions or not particularly specifying things- its more general? This explanation as veryyy good, I think sometimes technical terms are super confusing.

    I have finished school now, so can't contact any teachers and I don't have any friends who are native speakers, so at the moment my only method of learning and self teaching is word reference and spanish dict://
     

    Lilac Honeybee

    New Member
    English
    Hi,
    Here are some general principles that will get you through. Little by little, you can refine your knowledge of the peculiarities in the usage and the differences between Spanish and English habits. If it comforts you, you should know that even the Spanish-speaking world doesn't agree all the time on which one to use.

    The direct object literally implies that the verb action is done directly to some noun (a person, a thing, even a concept). All of these direct objects could be represented by direct object pronouns. A significant quirk in Spanish is that if the direct object is a specific person, you must use 'a' before that noun (and this creates confusion between direct and indirect objects representing people).

    I see the table. Veo la mesa. La veo.
    I see the confusion. Veo la confusión. La veo.
    I see the student. Veo a la estudiante. La veo.

    The indirect object implies that some action is done to or for someone (yes, usually a person, although it could be some other type of noun). This person benefits or loses from the verb action, but this is not being done directly to him or her. The indirect object is always preceded by the preposition 'a' in Spanish (which creates some confusion with the 'personal a' that I mentioned above).

    We give money to the poor. Damos dinero a los pobres. Les demos dinero.
    The salad is pleasing to us. La ensalada gusta a nosotros. La ensalada nos gusta. [Now do you see the answer to your original question? The salad is doing the action of pleasing to us. In other words, the salad gives pleasure to us (indirect object).]
    That makes so much sense, thank you!!
     
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