-te + -te

John_Doe

Senior Member
Russian
Hello,
Could you help me with untangling the grammar of this little piece of conversation?
A: 疲れたら休んくださっていいですよ。
B: なあに!平気ですよ!
A: 男の子が来てくれて助かるわ
The source: Kanon (remake)
First, I see the -te + kudasai pattern. Kudasaru itself is in the -te form because it's included in the -te mo ii pattern. Well, there's no mo for some reason. So, literally it would be "A: If you get tired, you may rest, please.". B answers, "I'm fine" (I'm calm?).

Then, -te + kureru. Because kureru is not at the end of the sentence, it itself takes the -te form. Literally, 'Boy came for me, and (it) helps'.

Am I right in my judgement?
 
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  • Yatalu

    Member
    Dutch (Flanders)
    -TE + KURERU
    The part of the ~て+ a verb of giving/receiving (もらう、やる、くれる、くださる、あげる、さしあげる ← I think that's all of them?)
    has the meaning that one person does something in the advantage of another.

    Example:
    食べてもらいました。 "(I acquired that) Someone ate (for me)." -- for instance, you put a lot of effort in cooking that for him/her. Or, it was a meal that you didn't like.

    As for particles, it just follows the pattern of normal giving/receiving-verbs:
    友達が 弟に チョコレートを くれました。 (My little brother got chocolate from my friend.)
    友達が 弟に チョコレートを 買ってくれました。 (My little brother acquired that my friend bought chocolate for him. -- My friend bought chocolate for my little brother.)


    -TE II / -TE MO II
    The difference between ~ていい and ~てもいい in my opinion lies, obviously within the も :3

    ~ていい literally means: "doing X, is good."
    Example:
    食べていいです。 "It's good to eat (it)."

    ~てもいい literally means: "doing X, is also good." This implies that doing Y, or not doing X, is fine as well.
    Example:
    食べてもいいです。 "It's good to eat it (but not eating it is fine as well)."

    ~てもいい can also be explained with the ~ても construction, which means "even if, even though".
    Example:
    食べてもいいです。 "Even if you eat it, it's good." (← very literal.)


    YOUR SENTENCE

    疲れたら
    休んくださっていいですよ
    "When you are tired, it is okay to (acquire to) take a break."

    男の子が来てくれて助かるわ
    "It will help that/if (I acquire that) the boy comes (for me)."



    If you want me to fully explain all the giving/receiving verbs mentioned at the start, I will make a new post about that.

    がんばってね、
    Yatta.
     

    John_Doe

    Senior Member
    Russian
    Thank you for taking the trouble to answering my question, Yatalu.
    If you want me to fully explain all the giving/receiving verbs mentioned at the start, I will make a new post about that.
    What you've explained about the giving-receiving thing is enough. Actually, what is of my main interest is, as the title says, -te + -te (-te + kudasatte, -te + kurete). I can't see if you agreed/confirmed my thoughts about it or not =)
     

    frequency

    Senior Member
    Japanese
    疲れたら休んくださっていいですよ。

    って is a connector? When this one is 休んで+いい, further, + ください, ください has to change to くださって by joining with よい.
    Why って?I don't know. Sorry I'm not sure about this kind of stuff.
     

    akimura

    Senior Member
    Japanese
    Hi John_Doe,

    I'm no grammarian so I could easily be wrong, but at least as a native Japanese speaker, the -te or -de you talking about are all used because they are not at the end of their corresponding sentence.

    Kudasaru itself is in the -te form because it's included in the -te mo ii pattern. Well, there's no mo for some reason.
    So to my ears, the -te here doesn't seem to be used because it's part of the -te mo ii pattern, but rather because 下さって is simply not at the end of the sentence. However, I understand that it's very useful for learners of Japanese as a foreign language to memorize structural patterns such as the -te mo ii pattern. Then I think you might as well want to see -te ii as another pattern, because I think both "-te mo ii" and "-te ii" play equally important parts in the Japanese language.

    Then, -te + kureru. Because kureru is not at the end of the sentence, it itself takes the -te form.
    Again I'm no grammarian, but I still think you are right in your judgment.
     

    John_Doe

    Senior Member
    Russian
    akimura, thank you for your valuable comment.

    So to my ears, the -te here doesn't seem to be used because it's part of the -te mo ii pattern, but rather because 下さって is simply not at the end of the sentence.
    So, it's just ii. Sounds more reasonable than my conjecture about the '-te mo ii' pattern.
     
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