1. desperatelearner Senior Member

    french
    hello!

    does anybody know what would be the best equivalent of a 'tea-gown' in french? I see that it is a 'robe' , I guess it is a gown that we wear at a kind of tea party. but it seems to me that we do not have an equivalent for this particular type of gown, and neither for a tea party . I don't think 'robe de soirée ' robe de coktail' works. Because I think we wear them in the evening.
     
  2. gardian

    gardian Banned

    Ireland
    English - Ireland
    :eek: En cette époque ?
     
  3. franc 91 Senior Member

    France
    English - GB
    There's a page which explains what a tea gown is on en.wikipedia, but I have found in a French collection - des robes de cocktail ou pour prendre le thé.
     
  4. Martyn94 Banned

    English
    I would have thought that "cocktail dresses" are very much more glamorous and "dressy" than "tea-gowns" (the difference between a cup of tea and a cocktail). The real problem, as gardian implies, is that "tea-gowns" went out before "cocktail dresses" came in, and were never worn outside a tiny minority of rich, idle and formal women. If there is evidence for "robe pour prendre le thé", I would go with that, unless you are up for some research into early 20C fashion-speak.
     
  5. myriamn

    myriamn Senior Member

    Haifa, Israel
    French
    Et "Tealength gown" sont des robes longues pour prendre le thé?
    Ici la jeune fille va à son bal de promo avec son petit-ami.
     
  6. franc 91 Senior Member

    France
    English - GB
    If you look on the web for - tea length dresses - I think you'll find what you are looking for. They are still there in the on-line catalogues.
     
  7. wildan1

    wildan1 Moderando ma non troppo (French-English, CC Mod)

    Yes, anything including "gown" implies that it is ankle-length: ballgown, tea gown, cocktail gown*, wedding gown, dressing gown, nightgown...

    *I don't think I've ever seen a woman wear a "gown" to a cocktail party--they usually wear a cocktail dress (knee-length or shorter).
     
  8. archijacq Senior Member

    Albi
    french France
    robe demi-longue (mi-mollet)

    Selon Harrap's :
    tea-gown - robe d'intérieur, déshabillé
     
  9. wildan1

    wildan1 Moderando ma non troppo (French-English, CC Mod)

    No, I don't think so--that sounds like a dressing gown.
     
  10. archijacq Senior Member

    Albi
    french France
    Tout dépend de l'époque.
    Voir article et photos (Wikipédia) :
    A tea gown or tea-gown is a woman's at-home dress for informal entertaining which became popular around the mid 19th century characterized by unstructured lines and light fabrics.

    Also known as the 'robe d'interieur', or the 'teagie', the tea gown was a long, flowing dress with wide sleeves based loosely on the Japanese kimono
     
    Last edited: Jan 11, 2019 at 8:32 PM
  11. myriamn

    myriamn Senior Member

    Haifa, Israel
    French

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