Teacher's helper in a classroom

sheilamontreal

Member
vietnamese
Hi,everybody here,
I try to find a counterparts for such students in my country: she/he is in class usually good at one particular subject let's say Math.and she then volunteers/be elected to be a kind of assistant to the Math teacher.Her extra jobs will including collecting homework of the class and send to math teacher, help passing around teaching materials,offering help when teacher isn't available.and she is most likely the math teacher's pet.
In my language, we call her "math representative" if I translate it word by word.
So, do you native speakers ever have such job titles in your school?
Thanks!
 
  • cropje_jnr

    Senior Member
    English - Australia
    It sounds like a type of teacher's student helper, but I don't think there is a set phrase for it. It would depend on firstly the region of the world and then secondly what the school or teacher decides to name this role.
     

    Musical Chairs

    Senior Member
    Japan & US, Japanese & English
    In college we call that a TA (for Teacher's Assistant) but he/she doesn't necessarily have to be very good in the subject. And they're not always "pets" (in fact, not usually).
     

    sheilamontreal

    Member
    vietnamese
    Thanks to you both.
    But it is in a junior high.I am afraid TEACHER' ASSISTANT would be too serious? And actually, each subject has its own "representative".
    I am waiting more ideas.
    Maybe you can make up a acceptable phrase as long as native speakers can get it with minimal effort.
    Thanks again.
     

    Musical Chairs

    Senior Member
    Japan & US, Japanese & English
    I think it's close enough to what you want to say. "Teacher's helper" would also work but in the US this is usually only in elementary school (their duties are usually something easy like cleaning the tables).
     

    Cagey

    post mod (English Only / Latin)
    English - US
    "Class monitor" is the term we used when I was in elementary school, but it may have gone out of fashion. These people helped with collecting papers and keeping the classroom in order (cleaning the boards, and so on). This position was considered an honor, and only the best students were appointed to it. However, they didn't answer questions or help other students with their school work. Sometimes they were considered teacher's pets.
     

    nichec

    Senior Member
    Chinese(Taiwan)/English(AE)
    In college we call that a TA (for Teacher's Assistant) but he/she doesn't necessarily have to be very good in the subject. And they're not always "pets" (in fact, not usually).

    This is the one I am familiar with too.

    There are TAs (teaching assistant) and RAs (research assistant), but I digress.
     

    maggi.82

    Member
    India, Few Indian Language's
    In my school, we use to have a class representative (C.R) who use to do all such stuff including representating our class.
     

    panjandrum

    Lapsed Moderator
    English-Ireland (top end)
    Like cagey, I come from an era when there the word "monitor" was used in some schools. In my primary school various pupils had different responsibilities but I don't recall there being particular titles. The teacher picked one of us to do whichever important task came to mind at the time - handing out books, putting straws into milk bottles, pouring ink into inkwells ... ... and on several notable occasions, going out to the nearby shop to buy cigarettes for him. It was quite some time ago :)
     

    Juana_D

    New Member
    Hello,
    I teach English to children aged 8 to 11. A different student takes the register every day, they also hand papers to their classmates and this kind of things. I don't like to call that student my "helper". I'd like to find a suitable word which also implied I'm-the-special-student-in-the-class-today. Is there a better word in this context? Thank you.

    << This new thread has been joined with an earlier thread. >>
     
    Last edited by a moderator:

    Copyright

    Senior Member
    American English
    I would say "teacher's assistant." If you come up with too cute a name for that special-for-day kid, it could easily cause problems among the children. Keep it generic and respectful.
     

    ewie

    Senior Member
    English English
    Welcome to the forum, Juana. When I was a little chap at school we had 'monitors': so whoever was in charge of handing out textbooks for the day* was book monitor; the person charged with filling inkwells** was ink monitor, etc. I dare say such practice has long since fallen out of use in British schools on the grounds that it's too traumatic, or taxing, or elitist, or some such nonsense, for young people.


    *I think it was weeks, actually.
    **For anyone who doesn't know what an inkwell is, see here ~ this site actually mentions 'monitors':)
     

    sdgraham

    Senior Member
    USA English
    Welcome to the forum, Juana.

    My wife, who is my adviser on all things educational, since she had a long career as teacher and administrator, says the local term here is "monitor."

    Since "teaching assistant" is a defined (paid) staff position here in Oregon, we would not use "assistant."

    I suspect, however, that it's one of those things that changes from location to location.
     

    wandle

    Senior Member
    English - British
    May I point out a mistake in the thread title? It ought to be: 'Teacher's helper in the classroom'.

    At my school, at primary level, 'monitor' meant a pupil with a disciplinary role outside the classroom.
    In each class, we had 'ink monitors' and 'milk monitors', distributing the respective items.

    Perhaps you could say 'class monitor', 'day monitor' or 'monitor of the day'.
     

    panjandrum

    Lapsed Moderator
    English-Ireland (top end)
    I have just consulted with a 5-year-old.
    In her class, each week two pupils are selected: one to be "helper" another to be "messenger" for the teacher.
    She refers to these pupils as the "the teacher's helper/messenger", or just "the helper/messenger".
     

    Cagey

    post mod (English Only / Latin)
    English - US
    I have merged the more recent thread with an earlier one on the same question.

    The newer thread begins at post #11.

    Cagey, moderator.
     
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