Teamwork: Not v cooperative re rota changes.

Herculesforlife

Member
Spanish
Teamwork: Not v cooperative re rota changes. Has personal problems with Asst Manager?
I don´t get the idea! And all these words:
v
re
rota
Asst
These are some notes a manager took about her receptionist and now he´s going to evaluate her.
 
  • Cenzontle

    Senior Member
    English, U.S.
    "Not very cooperative with regard to [rota???] changes. She has personal problems with the Assistant Manager."
    Sorry, I don't have an idea about "rota".
    "V" for "very" seems like the writer's personal device; don't imitate it.
     

    Herculesforlife

    Member
    Spanish
    Cenzontle, this is British English, could be that ROTA CHANGES, refers to SHIFTS CHANGES (in American English)? Maybe the receptionist is not very happy with the SHIFTS CHANGES she´s having at work. I´m just guessing.
     

    Cenzontle

    Senior Member
    English, U.S.
    I would call them "shift [singular] changes". Maybe British workers "rotate" from one shift to another? I'm just guessing too.
     

    k-in-sc

    Senior Member
    U.S. English
    A shift rota is short for a ‘rotating shift schedule’. That means that the schedule is the same every umpteenth (n-th) week (or day for that matter). For instance you might have 4 different weekly shift templates where your employees work different hours to get a little variation and maybe not always work friday night… The shift scheduling is then based on these four templates meaning that every 4th week is the same schedule.

    http://www.busybeemanager.com/shift-rota-why-and-how/
     

    Cenzontle

    Senior Member
    English, U.S.
    That (British) writer seems to give a pretty good definition: "when you start, what days you have off and the weekends you will work".
    He/she also uses the phrase "rota change", which suggests that "rota" was not just one writer's shorthand for something like "rotational".
    Let's wait for a Brit.Eng. speaker to chime in.
     
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