teardrop for teardrop

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Garin

Senior Member
Czech - Czechia
Hello, everybody,
in an introduction to the comics book "100 Bullets" Manuel Ramos, a crime fiction novels writer, praises the comics saying (among others):

...Then there is the absolutely magnificient artwork, inside and out, that matches the words and action,
teardrop for teardrop, splatter for splatter.

I am just wondering, is the part in red idiomatic or derived from an idiom? Or should I just take it literally - i.e. (correct me, if I am wrong) every teardrop or splatter mentioned in the script has been very skillfully drawn by the artist.
 
  • PaulQ

    Banned
    UK
    English - England
    I would understand it as "every teardrop or splatter mentioned in the script has been very skillfully drawn by the artist."

    "X for x, y for y, etc." is quite common.
     

    PaulQ

    Banned
    UK
    English - England
    Other common uses of the construction are:

    "I want you to read out the statement word for word." i.e. exactly as it is written.
    "In the second round, the boxers traded blow for blow." i.e. as A hit B, B hit A and so on.
    "These apples represent excellent value, pound for pound." i.e. compared with a pound of other apples, a pound of these apples is excellent value.

    and famously from the Code of Hammurabi: "An eye for an eye and a tooth for a tooth." i.e. whatever someone does to you, the law shall do to him.
     
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