Tedesco

Keith L. McMurray

New Member
United States English
I notice that the Italian word for "Germany" is GERMANIA, yet the word for "German" is TEDESCO. I cannot find any Latin source for TEDESCO and I suspect that it is not from the Latin. Could you tell me the origin of the word TEDESCO and how it came to be used to signify "German"?? I seem to have exhausted my meager resources. Thank you for you assistance.

Sincerely, Keith L. McMurray
 
  • Jana337

    Senior Member
    čeština
    Keith L. McMurray said:
    I notice that the Italian word for "Germany" is GERMANIA, yet the word for "German" is TEDESCO. I cannot find any Latin source for TEDESCO and I suspect that it is not from the Latin. Could you tell me the origin of the word TEDESCO and how it came to be used to signify "German"?? I seem to have exhausted my meager resources. Thank you for you assistance.

    Sincerely, Keith L. McMurray

    Hi Keith,

    welcome! :)

    Please check this most interesting thread from the German forum (written in English). It is wider than what you request but the origin of "tedesco" was addressed by Silvia.

    Hope this helps.

    Jana
     

    Keith L. McMurray

    New Member
    United States English
    Jana, Thanks! I see others were curious about the name TEDESCO as well. The info you directed me to was very helpful, especially Silvia's. Thanks again. Now I'll be able to sleep tonight.


    Keith
     

    Jana337

    Senior Member
    čeština
    Here's another source - if you are able to read in Italian.

    Keith L. McMurray said:
    Jana, Thanks! I see others were curious about the name TEDESCO as well. The info you directed me to was very helpful, especially Silvia's. Thanks again. Now I'll be able to sleep tonight.
    Me too. Good night. :)

    Jana
     

    Snakeman

    New Member
    Germany, German
    Keith L. McMurray said:
    I notice that the Italian word for "Germany" is GERMANIA, yet the word for "German" is TEDESCO. I cannot find any Latin source for TEDESCO and I suspect that it is not from the Latin. Could you tell me the origin of the word TEDESCO and how it came to be used to signify "German"?? I seem to have exhausted my meager resources. Thank you for you assistance.

    Sincerely, Keith L. McMurray

    Hi Keith,
    It's kind of funny with us Germans. The adjective "German" and the noun "Germany" is taken in non-German languages from various German tribes following the pars pro toto principle (call the whole after a part of it). The French call us after the Allemans, the English after the Germans, the Hungarians call us after the Swabians (to which tribe I belong), we ourselves call our language "Deutsch", meaning as much as "of the people" in contrast to Latin. Once the upper class spoke Latin, and the common people spoke common langage - "deutsch" or phonetically "doitch". Tedesco is an Italian alliteration to this. The language in The Netherlands is "Dutch", sort of a German dialect. Guess what the roots of the adverb "Dutch" are.
    Hoping this helps,
    Snakeman
     

    Godfather

    Member
    German, Switzerland
    Snakeman said:
    the Hungarians call us after the Swabians (to which tribe I belong)
    I've always wondered why many (older?) people in Switzerland called the Germans "d'Schwabe" instead of "die Tütsche". This makes absolutely sense to me now. ;)
     

    Londoner06

    Senior Member
    US/English, Spanish
    Buona sera, membri!

    I am curious to know about the word tedesco, why a German is not a germano. Does anyone have any ideas about the origin of the word tedesco?

    BTW, the Word Reference dictionary has this entry for germano:

    germano:

    germano adj. German (closely related)
    Alex
     

    Hockey13

    Senior Member
    AmEnglish/German
    Buona sera, membri!

    I am curious to know about the word tedesco, why a German is not a germano. Does anyone have any ideas about the origin of the word tedesco?

    BTW, the Word Reference dictionary has this entry for germano:

    germano:

    germano adj. German (closely related)
    Alex

    Why germano and not deutscho?

    Germany is situated in the center of a continent that has not always known its existence. The Italians often dealth with the Germans from the south and from a different era (see Roman invasion), the English and the French dealt with the Germans from the west. The Germans call themselves something else...it could go on and on.
     

    infinite sadness

    Senior Member
    italiano
    BTW, the Word Reference dictionary has this entry for germano:

    germano:

    germano adj. German (closely related)
    Alex

    By my opinion, that translation is incorrect.
    I never heard the word germano whit the meaning of tedesco (german).
     

    TrentinaNE

    Senior Member
    USA
    English (American)
    De Mauro agrees:
    agg., s.m.
    1 agg. TS stor., degli antichi Germani; germanico: costumi, popoli germani | agg., s.m., che, chi apparteneva ai Germani | s.m.pl. con iniz. maiusc., denominazione generica delle antiche popolazioni stanziate nell’Europa centrale
    2 agg. BU della Germania moderna; tedesco [quadro 1]
     

    stoddard

    Senior Member
    Italian
    Germano = fratello ( hermano in spanish)
    Germano = kind of duck
    Germano= tedesco ( only lyric or poetic or latinism). I heard rarely of that and only in ( italian ) poetry. So I don't think it is common use. I think De Mauro reports it only for completeness.

    Otherwise : tedesco = germanico adj ( a little old fashioned, more used during the fascism in Italy)
     
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