Temple dinner.

Dimitris29

Senior Member
Greek
Hi.

In a comedy series, someone invites their friends to a temple dinner where they're going to give a speech.
Based on video, it's similar to a TED talk, and they talk about psyche-related things.
It's a satire, though.

Anyway, that someone says:
If you're sticking around for temple dinner,
you should all come to my talk tonight.


So, what exactly is a temple dinner?
Is it a cult thing?
Could you provide a synonym?

Thank you.
 
  • heypresto

    Senior Member
    English - England
    I would imagine it's a dinner in a temple, or organised by the members of a temple.

    But with no context, and without knowing who the speaker is, or which series it's from, or where it's set, I can only guess.
     

    Keith Bradford

    Senior Member
    English (Midlands UK)
    It's a phrase that is common to various religious groups, and some non-religious ones too. Can you tell us what religion/profession these people are in? Failing that, their names? Saying "someone in a comedy series" isn't much help.
     

    Dimitris29

    Senior Member
    Greek
    The series is unaired.
    The temple dinner is located in an open area.
    There is one presenter, like in TED talks, who talks about psyche-related things, and there are many followers who listen to these courses.
    The speaker who said "come to my temple dinner tonight" is someone who has recently converted from... nothing (exactly) to psychology related stuff with a lot of big words. I really cannot describe it better.
    Seems like a psychology cult to me.
    Anyway, what I get from your responses is that "temple dinner" refers only to religious groups.
    Right?
     

    Dimitris29

    Senior Member
    Greek
    So, what is it exactly?
    An official gathering of any group of people?
    Is there a synonym?
    "Temple" baffles me, because it sounds like a religious only thing.
    Why "temple" and not something else?
     

    dojibear

    Senior Member
    English (US - northeast)
    A Jewish church is called a "temple", not a "church". Other religions call their worship buildings "temples". Many oriental buildings or groups of buildings are called "temples", if the people living there are religious (monks, nuns, priests, etc.).

    But many worship buildings have meeting rooms that are not used for religious purposes. They are used for parties, club meetings, dinners, and other non-religious activities. Churches have them. Temples have them.

    A "dinner" is a group sharing a meal. It could be any kind of group. It being located in a church/temple does not imply that the group is religious or the dinner is religious.
     

    dojibear

    Senior Member
    English (US - northeast)
    The speaker who said "come to my temple dinner tonight" is someone who has recently converted from... nothing (exactly) to psychology related stuff with a lot of big words. I really cannot describe it better.
    Seems like a psychology cult to me.
    In the US, from around 1960 to 2021, there are a lot of "new age" groups. There are many popular "new age" books, and many popular "new age" speakers. "New age" is a mixture of psychology, philosophy and religion.

    You describe a dinner with a speaker. People come there to listen to the speech, in a casual and comfortable situation (sharing a meal). The speaker is probably sharing some ideas from "new age" philosophy.

    We don't use the word "cult" for this. The word "cult" is negative, and implies a dangerous, obsessive or fanatical group.
     

    Dimitris29

    Senior Member
    Greek
    I see.
    Could you please provide a synonym to "temple" for what you're describing?
    I cannot translate the term word to word, it would sound weird.
    Is "official dinner" (for something) correct?
     

    Myridon

    Senior Member
    English - US
    The Masons/Freemasons call some of their buildings "temples". They are not a religious organization.
    Masonic Temple - Wikipedia
    A Masonic Temple or Masonic Hall is, within Freemasonry, the room or edifice where a Masonic Lodge meets. Masonic Temple may also refer to an abstract spiritual goal and the conceptual ritualistic space of a meeting.
     

    Dimitris29

    Senior Member
    Greek
    Thank you.
    I get it now.
    I cannot seem to find a synonym though.
    I don't think there is something like that in my language.
    My first guess would be "synagogue", but you've all made it clear it could refer to a non-religious gathering too.
    I'm probably going to go with "official dinner" (of some group of people).
    Anyway, thank you all.
     

    dojibear

    Senior Member
    English (US - northeast)
    I don't think "official" is right -- that sounds like "government".

    If you're sticking around for temple dinner,
    you should all come to my talk tonight.
    In this context, "temple dinner" sounds like a regular event -- at this particular temple, there is a "dinner" (a casual social event) every week or every month. Sometimes there is a speaker. This time, he is the speaker, since he says "my talk".

    I think the word "temple" isn't important here. Various clubs have weekly or monthly social events.
     

    Keith Bradford

    Senior Member
    English (Midlands UK)
    The Masons/Freemasons call some of their buildings "temples". They are not a religious organization...
    Likewise some lawyers operating in the Inns of Court in London:
    There are four Inns of Court – Gray's Inn, Lincoln's Inn, Inner Temple and Middle Temple.[1]
    ... They have supervisory and disciplinary functions over their members. The Inns also provide libraries, dining facilities and professional accommodation. (My bold emphasis.)​
    Perhaps in the absence of better information, you could translate it as dinner talk.
     

    Dimitris29

    Senior Member
    Greek
    As I said earlier, it's an unaired show, an animation series. I am not at liberty to say which one (because of a NDA).
    I would say, it is a much lighter version of Family Guy with no vulgarity but with a lot of sexual innuendos.
    It is supposed to be kids program. I don't see it, but never mind.
    The speaker talks about general psychology stuff using pompous words to their followers audience and bedazzles them.
    It's a satire to all these related stuff happening real life.
    That's why I said it's similar to a TED talk, but satirical and with a brainwashed audience.

    Anyway, I think I found a one-word definition for my language, so thank you all for your responses.
     
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