tempo tis/tempo imp

Bella1

Senior Member
UK Bilingual French/English
I'm translating an Italian garage car servicing worksheet. There are two columns headed TEMPO TIS and TEMPO IMP. In the first there are figures such as 0,5 which is obviously part of an hour or work unit. Any ideas of the Italian, please?
 
  • Fooler

    Senior Member
    Italian (Italy)
    Maybe Tempo Impiegato Stimato ?
    Is the 0,5 figure the estimated/minimum time and the following column the effective time they take them ? IMP=impiegato
    Just my try
     
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    Starless74

    Senior Member
    Italiano
    I sincerely have no idea of what those acronyms mean,
    but if you have "TEMPO TIS" it seems strange to me that the 'T' in TIS stands for tempo (again).
    Everything's possible, nevertheless...
     
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    Bella1

    Senior Member
    UK Bilingual French/English
    Starless74 - There was no room in the box and the word TEMPO had to be mentioned in any case as the heading.
     

    Bella1

    Senior Member
    UK Bilingual French/English
    Pietruzzo and Benzene - It's academic now as I had to send the file by 11am thjs morning. For information I used EST TIME and ACTUAL TIME. But thanks for your input.
     

    Benzene

    Senior Member
    Italian from Italy
    Pietruzzo and Benzene - It's academic now as I had to send the file by 11am thjs morning. For information I used EST TIME and ACTUAL TIME. But thanks for your input.
    Hello Bella1!

    I would personally translate the abbreviations as follows:

    1. Forecasted Worked Time = FWT
    2. Actual Worked Time = AWT

    Bye,
    Benzene
     
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    MR1492

    Senior Member
    English -USA
    Hello Bella1!

    I would personally translate the abbreviations as follows:

    1. Forecasted Worked Time = FWT
    2. Actual Worked Time = AWT

    Bye,
    Benzene
    I think you have it right, Benzene. In AE, we would probably use the long titles as noted above. If you want to keep everything in the same tense, I think it would have to be Forecasted Time Worked and Actual Time Worked.

    Phil
     

    ain'ttranslationfun?

    Senior Member
    US English
    I think you have it right, Benzene. In AE, we would probably use the long titles as noted above. If you want to keep everything in the same tense, I think it would have to be Forecasted Time Worked and Actual Time Worked.

    Phil
    Hi, MR1492,

    Forgive me, but isn't "forecast" an irregular verb: "forecasted work time"?
     

    Benzene

    Senior Member
    Italian from Italy
    I memorized "forecasted" many years ago, although I learnt in the past that "to forecast" is an irregular verb.

    However, I have seen that both forms can be used, but I do not know which of the two forms is the most used.

    I checked three tables of English irregular verbs, but in none of them there was the verb "to forecast".

    I propose - only for reference purposes - a table that seems to me to be the most complete and reliable. Please look at here: Verbi Irregolari Inglesi: la Tabella con la lista completa!

    Quote
    Definition of forecast in English from EOD:
    forecast
    VERB (forecast, forecasted)
    [WITH OBJECT]
    Predict or estimate (a future event or trend)

    I wrote "learnt" above but the verb "to learn" has two forms "learnt and learned" as per the following explanation copied from the web:
    "these are alternative forms of the past tense and past participle of the verb learn. Both are acceptable, but learned is often used in both British English and American English, while learnt is much more common in British English than in American English.
    We learned the news at about three o'clock."
    [Source: "Learnt" Or "Learned"? | Lexico]

    Bye,
    Benzene
     
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    Benzene

    Senior Member
    Italian from Italy
    I think you have it right, Benzene. In AE, we would probably use the long titles as noted above. If you want to keep everything in the same tense, I think it would have to be Forecasted Time Worked and Actual Time Worked.

    Phil
    Thanks Phil for your suggestion.

    Bye,
    Sandro
     
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