Ten minutes' walk / a ten-minute walk. What's the difference in meaning?

Dujina

Member
Russian-Russia
Hello! Sorry for raising a question that has already been discussed so many times, but my question is not about grammar points. It's about the difference in meaning as I haven't found much concerning it. I can't figure out when I should use the first pattern and when the second one. Could you give some examples/situations demonstrating the difference, please? (the question is not only about the word "walk", but about the pattern on the whole). I appreciate your help.
 
  • PaulQ

    Senior Member
    UK
    English - England
    There is no real difference.
    Ten (adj.) minutes'(n.) walk = a walk of 10 minutes
    a {ten-minute}(adj.) walk. = a walk that lasts for 10 minutes.

    Note that {number + singular noun} = adjectival phrase.
     

    lingobingo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    “A ten-minute walk” is the most typical way to describe a walk that takes ten minutes.

    “Ten minutes’ walk” is a little unusual. But you could, for example, say that your exercise regime includes at least “ten minutes’ walking” (or “ten minutes of walking”) every day.
     

    Dujina

    Member
    Russian-Russia
    There is no real difference.
    Ten (adj.) minutes'(n.) walk = a walk of 10 minutes
    a {ten-minute}(adj.) walk. = a walk that lasts for 10 minutes.

    Note that {number + singular noun} = adjectival phrase.
    “A ten-minute walk” is the most typical way to describe a walk that takes ten minutes.

    “Ten minutes’ walk” is a little unusual. But you could, for example, say that your exercise regime includes at least “ten minutes’ walking” (or “ten minutes of walking”) every day.

    Thank you!
     
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