Tengo na minchia tanta

Spanish, Peru
#1
Ok, so this might look like a waste of time for many of you, but I really couldn't hold my curiosity anymore. "Tengo na minchia tanta" is the title of a Frank Zappa song included in the Uncle Meat cd. What on earth does that mean???

Thank you so much!
Bruno.

PS: I'm pasting some of the lyrics below, just in case someone gets curious.


Ah, tengo na minchia tanta
Tengo na minchia accussi'
Devi usare un pollo
...Se me la vuoi tastar
  1. Song lyrics may be quoted up to a maximum of four lines. Members are welcome to post links to complete lyrics, but may not copy extensive quotations to these forums for copyright legal reasons. Threads and posts with song lyric quotations beyond four lines will be removed.
 
  • danalto

    Senior Member
    Italy - Italian
    #2
    Be careful! It's a very vulgar expression, in southern dialect (Sicily) meaning "I have a very big c...k" :)
     
    Spanish, Peru
    #4
    oh my god! I'm sorry! :S
    I should have known better... it's Zappa, afterall!

    Well... but then... just before we forget the whole thing... What does it mean "accussi" (in that context)?
     
    Spanish, Peru
    #7
    Well, yes, it's been included in the cd version of Uncle Meat (it wasn't on the original LP version).

    If you have the chance, listen to it. Now that I know what it means, together with the sleazy voice of the singer, it makes it even funnier.
     

    Kleine Hexe

    Senior Member
    Italian Italy
    #12
    usa_scott said:
    Davvero? Mi sembra che sono molto simili, allora.
    Beh, effettivamente "tengo" non è siciliano e neanche "pappà", "accussì" può essere sia siciliano che napoletano, mentre sulla parola "m*****" non ci sono dubbi, e' siciliana!
    Credo sia un mix di dialetti e italiano. :)
     

    V52

    Member Emeritus
    Italy Italian
    #14
    Just to add an information:
    the word :warn: "minchia" :warn: is definitely dialectal from Sicily, and not coming from Neapolitan.The differences between the two dialects (I'd say languages) are enormous in pronounce and constructions of phrases and periods. The word comes from Latin "mentula" .
    Vittorio
     
    English American & (Latin), Texas, USA
    #15
    Salve! i'm curious about the derivation of minchia from mentula I know /tu/ >> /chu/ sometimes, but how and why did the /l/ get dropped. are their any other sicilian dialectical words that exhibit this safe phonological pattern. I heard this word watching " l'Ispetore Coliandro" over the internet on RAI Click.
    Magister Texas :){>
     

    Sorcha

    Senior Member
    Ireland, English
    #16
    May I ask, (or rather dare I!!), about the secnd two lines. What do they mean? I'm just wondering does pollo refer to a chicken? And tastar to taste???
     

    _forumuser_

    Senior Member
    Italian
    #17
    May I ask, (or rather dare I!!), about the secnd two lines. What do they mean? I'm just wondering does pollo refer to a chicken? And tastar to taste???
    Tastare means to grope. So the sentence reads:

    You need to use a chicken to grope it

    No idea what it means, though. Let me also point out that the correct translation of accussi' here is "this/that big."
     
    Italy, Italiano
    #18
    Può essere questa la traduzione dell'ultima frase?

    Se me la vuoi tastar = If you want to feel it to me = if you want to examine my c..k by touch
     
    English American & (Latin), Texas, USA
    #19
    /mentula/ CL >> /mentla/* VL >> /mentchia/ or ?/mintchia/? Old Ital? Dialect? >> /minchia/ Sicilian?
    From Classical to Vulgar Latin the fist pholological effect is syncpation like poculum >> poclum
    VL /la/>> Italian /ia/ like Clarus >> Chiaro

    but how does the /t/ get lost, does it combine with the /l/ to make a /chia/.
    I'm curious to gain any insight y'all might have.
    grazie a tutti.
     
    Italy, Italiano
    #20
    Just to add an information:
    the word :warn: "minchia" :warn: is definitely dialectal from Sicily, and not coming from Neapolitan.The differences between the two dialects (I'd say languages) are enormous in pronounce and constructions of phrases and periods. The word comes from Latin "mentula" .
    Vittorio
    Does "Minchia" come from "mingere" = "to urinate" ?
     
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