tense: between a past date and a future date

Jana337

Senior Member
čeština
Hello,

Many apologies for such a silly title but I don't know how to word it properly. :)

In which tense should the verb in the following sentence be?

The funding decision was made in January 2008. All project we approved are (?) / have been and will be (?) / are being (?) carried out between April 2008 and March 2009.

This is a statement of a foundation and was written now in June 2008 if that helps. I'm trying to convince myself that the present works but I'm far from sure. I guess I could replace it by a trouble-free construction like "the period of implementation is ...". However, I am curious. :)
 
  • charisma_classic

    Senior Member
    English, U.S.A.
    All (the) projects we approved will be carried out between April 2008 and March 2009.

    Even though you have already started, the process is still continuing and not complete. They have not yet been "carried out". As we are discussing plans, I think "will be" is the most appropriate option.

    All (the) projects we approved are being carried out at this time.

    In this case, "are being" would be a better option, since we are discussing only a current event.
     

    wheaten

    Member
    USA english; Canadian English
    I suggest: All the projects we approved were to be carried out between April 2008 and March 2009.

    This leaves it open as to what has been done, which is a separate issue.
     

    Illuminatus

    Senior Member
    India, Hindi, English, Marathi
    I will tell you the exact meaning conveyed by the three options you have given:

    The funding decision was made in January 2008. All project we approved are carried out between April 2008 and March 2009.

    It tells a universal rule: that all projects are, as a matter of practice/habit, or as a plain fact, are carried out between the two dates.

    The funding decision was made in January 2008. All project we approved have been and will be carried out between April 2008 and March 2009.

    This conveys the meaning that all projects that you have approved have been carried out between the two dates in the past and will continue to be carried out in the future. This obviously makes no sense, unless you can time travel multiple times :). But it is meaningful in a sentence like this: All projects we commit to have been and will be carried out on time. Though, I am sure that this sounds slightly rude, rather, not-nice.

    The third option is the one which conveys your meaning.

    BTW, it will be projects, with the s, though I guess that was just a typing error.
     
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    Illuminatus

    Senior Member
    India, Hindi, English, Marathi
    I agree, but I think Wheaten wanted to differentiate between what was supposed to be done and what might actually be taking place. But yeah, a better wording for that would be like:

    All the projects we approved are planned/supposed to be carried out between April 2008 and March 2009.

    What is your opinion?
     

    charisma_classic

    Senior Member
    English, U.S.A.
    All the projects we approved are to be carried out between April 2008 and March 2009.

    I think this is a firmer statement. If I add "planned" or "supposed" then I am opening the door for the possibility of failure. This is a firm statement of the company's expectations (and which implies that it is their plan).
     

    panjandrum

    Lapsed Moderator
    English-Ireland (top end)
    Hello,

    Many apologies for such a silly title but I don't know how to word it properly. :)

    In which tense should the verb in the following sentence be?

    The funding decision was made in January 2008. All project we approved are (?) / have been and will be (?) / are being (?) carried out between April 2008 and March 2009.

    This is a statement of a foundation and was written now in June 2008 if that helps. I'm trying to convince myself that the present works but I'm far from sure. I guess I could replace it by a trouble-free construction like "the period of implementation is ...". However, I am curious. :)
    All projects we approved were to be carried out between April 2008 and March 2009.

    Wheaten said that at post #4.
    I think he was right.

    It is now June 2008.
    You can't say that "All the projects we approved are to be carried out between April 2008 and March 2009."
    Some of the projects may already be completed.
    Some may already have collapsed.

    Let me explain.
    All projects we approved were <according to their plans as approved> to be carried out between April 2008 and March 2009.
     
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    Piotr_WRF

    Senior Member
    Polish, German
    Wouldn't the following sentence be better to convey what Jana has meant: All projects we have approved are to be carried out between April 2008 and March 2009. What do you think?
     
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    cuchuflete

    Senior Member
    EEUU-inglés
    The funding decision was made in January 2008. All project we approved are (?) / have been and will be (?) / are being (?) carried out between April 2008 and March 2009.
    As a lover of context, I would want more of it before deciding on the most precise wording. The following are possible contextual statements, and the phrasing that would result from them.

    1. Funding for all projects was approved in January. All projects have begun. None is yet complete. All projects approved in January have been in progress since April (of this year) and will be completed by March of 2009.

    2.
    Funding approved in Jan. All projects have begun. Some are complete.
    All projects approved in January have been in progress since April (of this year) and those not already done will be completed by March of 2009.

    3. Funding approved in Jan. Not all projects have begun. None are complete yet.All projects approved in January will be completed by March of 2009, with some having begun as early as April of this year.


     

    Jana337

    Senior Member
    čeština
    Thanks everyone; a very interesting discussion. :)
    1. Funding for all projects was approved in January. All projects have begun. None is yet complete. All projects approved in January have been in progress since April (of this year) and will be completed by March of 2009.

    2.
    Funding approved in Jan. All projects have begun. Some are complete.
    All projects approved in January have been in progress since April (of this year) and those not already done will be completed by March of 2009.

    3. Funding approved in Jan. Not all projects have begun. None are complete yet.All projects approved in January will be completed by March of 2009, with some having begun as early as April of this year.
    Unfortunately, I have no way of knowing such details so my sentence needs to obfuscate those issues to accommodate any of the aforementioned interpretations. :)

    A theoretical suggestion that I don't mean to use but I'd like to know how it works from the viewpoint of pure grammar:
    All projects we approved will have been carried out between April 2008 and March 2009.
     

    Cagey

    post mod (English Only / Latin)
    English - US
    A theoretical suggestion that I don't mean to use but I'd like to know how it works from the viewpoint of pure grammar:

    All projects we approved will have been carried out between April 2008 and March 2009.
    This works for me. Even if some of the projects have been worked out already (in the past as we speak) you are promising that all of them will have been finished by a point in the future: March 2009.

    In fact, that will be true even if you already have finished them all as you speak. "Will have been" allows you to work ahead; it only sets the point in time at which you will look back and say "they all have been finished".
     

    panjandrum

    Lapsed Moderator
    English-Ireland (top end)
    Thanks everyone; a very interesting discussion. :)

    Unfortunately, I have no way of knowing such details so my sentence needs to obfuscate those issues to accommodate any of the aforementioned interpretations. :)

    A theoretical suggestion that I don't mean to use but I'd like to know how it works from the viewpoint of pure grammar:
    All projects we approved will have been carried out between April 2008 and March 2009.
    That might be possible if you know they will all proceed according to plan.
     
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