tense in adj phrase

Shooting Stars

Senior Member
Chinese
Open in 2010, the hotel is a four star property.

A friend of mine wrote the sentence, which I think is wrong. It should be "The hotel, which was open in 2010, is a four star property." But my friend disagrees, he thinks both sentences are right. The reason I think it is wrong is as follows.

Open in 2010 is an adj phrase with no verbs indicating its tense. This job of indicating tense falls onto the verb in the main clause. In other words, the tense in an adj phrase depends on the main clause. If the main verb is present, the adj phrase is present. If the main verb is past tense, the adj phrase is past tense too.

In this case, the main verb is "is", present tense, so the adj phrase "Open in 2010" should be present. But present tense is conflicting with the phrase in 2010 which requires the past tense. That is why I think it is wrong.

Am I right, thank you.
 
Last edited:
  • dojibear

    Senior Member
    English - Northeast US
    It should be "Opened in 2010, the hotel is a four star property."

    Or it could be "Open since 2010, the hotel is a four star property."
     

    Andygc

    Senior Member
    British English
    It should be "opened". The full form would be "The hotel, which was opened in 2010, ..." It's not a matter of an adjectival phrase having a tense, it's a passive construction using a past participle.
     

    Shooting Stars

    Senior Member
    Chinese
    It should be "Opened in 2010, the hotel is a four star property.
    Opened in 2010, the hotel is ...= The hotel is opened in 2010, the hotel is ...
    The verb "is" disagrees with the phrase in 2010. Could you tell me why this sentence is right?

    Thank you.
     

    mink-shin

    Senior Member
    Korean - Korea, Republic of
    Hi, I have a question.

    What about 'having opened' instead of 'opened'?
    I've seen the phrase 'having opened in ****' used in some formal English.
    I think they, which are 'having opened ~' and 'opened ~', are more or less synonymous in this context. Is it correct?
     

    Andygc

    Senior Member
    British English
    Opened in 2010, the hotel is ...= The hotel is opened in 2010, the hotel is ...
    No that is not what it means. I have already told you that "Opened in 2010, the hotel ..." means "The hotel, which was opened in 2010, ...". The verb in "the hotel is a four star property" is wholly irrelevant to the phrase "opened in 2010". It doesn't disagree with it - there is no connection of any sort between them. "Opened in 2010" describes the hotel, just as a label attached to a washing machine which says "Made in China" describes the washing machine, not what the washing machine now achieves or does.

    Compare this with:
    "Born in 1956, Theresa May is the new British prime minister."
    "Born in 1925, Margaret Thatcher was the first woman prime minister."
    "Made in China, this washing machine is the market leader in much of Asia."
     

    daunting

    New Member
    English - United States
    Mink-shin, yes, "having opened" or "having been opened" could be used instead of "opened". ["Having been opened" could only be used to describe the hotel itself ("Having been opened in 2010, this hotel...") while "having opened" could be also used to construct a sentence with the entity that opened the hotel; ex. "Having opened his hotel in 2010, Bob..." or "Having opened in 2010, the hotel..."]
     

    mink-shin

    Senior Member
    Korean - Korea, Republic of
    Mink-shin, yes, "having opened" or "having been opened" could be used instead of "opened". ["Having been opened" could only be used to describe the hotel itself ("Having been opened in 2010, this hotel...") while "having opened" could be also used to construct a sentence with the entity that opened the hotel; ex. "Having opened his hotel in 2010, Bob..." or "Having opened in 2010, the hotel..."]
    Hi, Daunting.

    Thank you for your kindness. :)

    I totally understand it, thanks to you.

    Have a good day, Daunting.
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top