tenses

Hi all,
Could someone please help me ON WHICH OCCASION will you use WHICH of the following sentences?
1. The train leaves at 6:30.
2. The train will leave at 6:30.
3. The train is leaving at 6:30.

1. He will leave at 6:30.
2. He is leaving at 6:30.
3. He leaves at 6:30.

Many many thanks in advance.
 
  • keepsakes

    Member
    English/Chinese Canada/China
    1. The train leaves at 6:30.
    2. The train will leave at 6:30.
    3. The train is leaving at 6:30.

    These three basically mean the same thing in common-day speaking. They all mean "The train will leave at 6:30"

    1. He will leave at 6:30.
    2. He is leaving at 6:30.
    3. He leaves at 6:30.

    3 is not commonly used.
    1 and 2 mean the same thing.
     

    keepsakes

    Member
    English/Chinese Canada/China
    They can be. In common speech, they're used interchangeably. In formal writing, it may be better to use "will [verb]" because it makes a bit more sense.

    In short:
    Spoken: interchangeable
    Formal writing: not-so-interchangeable
     

    keepsakes

    Member
    English/Chinese Canada/China
    That said, I feel rather confused about this question:
    We ____ a party this evening,be sure to come with us.
    A. will have B. have C. are having. D....
    The key is B. Shall A and C be acceptable?

    C is the smoothest-sounding one to me.
    A works, but no one really speaks that way.
    B is wrong. It uses a present tense in a future.
     
    Intereting.I was taught that when a thing will happen according to a schedule or something, I should use the present sense instead of the future tense.eg:My English training program finishes next month.In this sentense, the use of will finish, is finishing is considered wrong. I really want to hear your comments on it. Thank you!
     

    soupdragon78

    Senior Member
    England English
    Hi dragon.
    I think your teacher must be very strict. The last three examples you gave all sound good to me. Which one sounds more natural would depend on the context.
     

    Vikorr

    Senior Member
    Australia, English
    Intereting.I was taught that when a thing will happen according to a schedule or something, I should use the present sense instead of the future tense.eg:My English training program finishes next month.In this sentense, the use of will finish, is finishing is considered wrong. I really want to hear your comments on it. Thank you!
    I’d say the confusion occurs because parties aren’t considered formally scheduled events. If the person holding the party was a stickler for timetables, then yes, he/she could say ‘it starts at 7:00pm and finishes at midnight’

    That said, I feel rather confused about this question:
    We ____ a party this evening,be sure to come with us.
    A. will have B. have C. are having. D....
    The key is B. Shall A and C be acceptable?
    This question is all wrong. We (have/will have/are having) a party – means the person (and the person with him/her) speaking, will be at the party's location, so the second half of the sentence ‘be sure to come with us’ is nonsensical.

    I wouldn’t use either A, B, or C. I would say ‘We are holding a party this evening’. Or ‘There will be a party at our place tonight’ or ‘There’s going to be a party at our place tonight.’ There’s many other ways to say this.
     

    Hockey13

    Senior Member
    AmEnglish/German
    This question is all wrong. We (have/will have/are having) a party – means the person (and the person with him/her) speaking, will be at the party's location, so the second half of the sentence ‘be sure to come with us’ is nonsensical.

    I wouldn’t use either A, B, or C. I would say ‘We are holding a party this evening’. Or ‘There will be a party at our place tonight’ or ‘There’s going to be a party at our place tonight.’ There’s many other ways to say this.

    Here it makes perfect sense to say:

    We're having/throwing a party tonight. Be sure to come [to our party]!

    You're asking the person to come to the party you are hosting. As Vikorr said, if you are hosting the party, the "with us" makes no sense because it implies that the speaker is going somewhere else to a party.
     

    gaer

    Senior Member
    US-English
    Hi all,
    Could someone please help me ON WHICH OCCASION will you use WHICH of the following sentences?
    1. The train leaves at 6:30.
    2. The train will leave at 6:30.
    3. The train is leaving at 6:30.

    1. He will leave at 6:30.
    2. He is leaving at 6:30.
    3. He leaves at 6:30.

    Many many thanks in advance.
    My personal opinion is that tests claiming that there is only one proper answer to such questions are damaging to those who are learning English.

    I think all of the phrases above will work, but the context might change a bit. If you look at the second set of choices, a huge factor would be what went before:

    When will he leave?
    He'll [he will] leave at 6:30.

    When is he leaving?
    He's leaving at 6:30.

    When does he leave?
    He leaves at 6:30.

    You could make a strong case for any of the above. For reasons that I can't explain, I prefer the second. I have no logic to support my choice!

    Books (or teachers) that attempt to explain English logically are usually very rigid and give you an unrealistic view of English that shows it to be much less flexible than it really is!

    Gaer
     
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