tension is falling off

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Arcona

Senior Member
German
Hello,

if I worked on a project many weeks and it was a very stressful time and then the project is over.
Could I say:
Now the tension of the last weeks is slowly falling off (me).

Is that anything you would say?
Would you understand what I mean?

Thank you
 
  • Packard

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    I would say:

    • receding
    • fading
    • diminishing
    • relaxing (I think I would use this. It carries two meanings and in this case those meanings mesh well.)
     

    PaulQ

    Banned
    UK
    English - England
    Could I say: Now the tension of the last weeks is slowly falling off (me).
    No, not really, you need "from" although yours would be understood:
    (i) you will see that it is used figuratively in the sense of "lessening" which is not compatible with "falling" and "from me" and I think "fading away" would be what I would say.
    (ii) falling away (from me) is OK.
    (ii) "Now the tension of the last weeks is slowly falling off", if used at all, would not be followed by me. "The tension" would seem to refer to an atmosphere of tension that surrounds you.
    (iii) If you wish to explain that it is your tension, and use "falling" - then "falling away from me" could work.
     

    Juhasz

    Senior Member
    English - United States
    That's a little too much of a mixed metaphor for me (tension, literally, is a force that is pulling on you; such a force wouldn't "fall off"). If you want to preserve the more literal sense of tension you could use easing up, slacken, lower, decrease, or as Packard said, relax. Otherwise, forgoing the literal sense, any synonym of lessen that doesn't so closely have to do with motion, or force (such as the Packard's other suggestions) would be fine.
     

    snargleplax

    Senior Member
    English - Northwestern United States
    I'm going to disagree -- "fall off" is fine. It implies a gradual reduction, like a line in a graph trending downward. It wouldn't mean that it's falling off of you, but that its level (as a notionally measurable quantity) is falling off.
     

    Packard

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    I'm going to disagree -- "fall off" is fine. It implies a gradual reduction, like a line in a graph trending downward. It wouldn't mean that it's falling off of you, but that its level (as a notionally measurable quantity) is falling off.
    While I agree that "fall off" is used to mean "diminishing", "fall off" and "tension" seem like an unlikely pairing.

    In photographic lighting we say "the light fall off is the square of the distance". But I've never heard "fall off" used to describe tension. Tension reminds me of two people pulling on a rope in opposite directions. Fall off does not seem to work with that visual imagery.
     

    kentix

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    Now the tension of the last weeks is slowly draining away.
    Now I feel the tension of the last few weeks draining away.
     

    snargleplax

    Senior Member
    English - Northwestern United States
    But I've never heard "fall off" used to describe tension. Tension reminds me of two people pulling on a rope in opposite directions. Fall off does not seem to work with that visual imagery.
    I don't see it as a mixed metaphor because there is an intermediary -- the metaphor "tension is a level." That is fine in itself, and a level (in the sense of a quantitative measure, like the chart line I mentioned) is something that can fall off. So, sort of a metaphorical "bridge" creating some distance and reducing the friction you perceive. But this is subjective.
     

    Packard

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    I don't see it as a mixed metaphor because there is an intermediary -- the metaphor "tension is a level." That is fine in itself, and a level (in the sense of a quantitative measure, like the chart line I mentioned) is something that can fall off. So, sort of a metaphorical "bridge" creating some distance and reducing the friction you perceive. But this is subjective.
    OK. I'll buy that.
     
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