tepid/lukewarm?

ladybugEnglishFan

Senior Member
Polish
What is the right word to say when you're at somebody's house and you would like him to give you a glass of water that is not too cold and not too warm?
 
  • Loob

    Senior Member
    English UK
    Could you give us the sentence in which you would like to use one of the adjectives, please, ladybugEnglishFan?
     

    ladybugEnglishFan

    Senior Member
    Polish
    Waiter asks : How would you like your water?, the person at the restaurant : "I'd like it ........, because I have a little cold, so I don't wan't it too cold."
     

    aes_uk

    Senior Member
    English - England
    I think "room temperature" is the best way to describe it - "tepid" means a bit warm and "lukewarm" means somewhere between cold and warm but it is mainly used in a negative way - for example "the food was lukewarm" but you wanted it hot.

    so I would say "I'd like it room temperature because I am* a little cold so I don't want it too cold".

    *In English, we say "to be cold", not "to have cold"
     
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