terriens, aviateurs et marins

fandenickylarson

Senior Member
français
In the military vocabulary, how do you say in English 'terriens '(militaries which belong to the land army), 'aviateurs' (militaries which belong to the air force , maybe airman?) and 'marins' (is it sailor even in a military context?) - Merci
 
  • broglet

    Senior Member
    English - England
    soldiers, airforce pilots (as opposed to commercial pilots and private pilots) and naval sailors (as opposed to merchant seamen)
     

    SirGavmister

    Member
    English-Canada
    Infantry would be a better word than soldier, because soldier is typically anyone part of the army, including the infantry, the airforce, and the navy
     
    Last edited:

    fandenickylarson

    Senior Member
    français
    INfantry? As far as I am concerned I made my military service in the signals (not in the infanterie) but I belonged to the land army.
    I am not sure that 'infantery' is a proper translation for 'terrien'.
     

    broglet

    Senior Member
    English - England
    tu as raison fandenicklarson - de toute façon 'the infantry' est une partie de l'armée de terre et ce n'est pas une personne
     

    Mauricet

    Senior Member
    French - France
    'aviateurs' (militaries which belong to the air force , maybe airman?)
    Je confirme : airmen pour "aviateurs" au sens "membres de l'armée de l'air".

    Au total, l'expression idiomatique "soldats, aviateurs et marins" se traduirait "Soldiers, Airmen and Seamen" éventuellement précédé ou suivi de "Marines".
     
    Last edited:

    broglet

    Senior Member
    English - England
    'Seaman' is not often used to mean marin in BE - although its homophonic associations make it useful for jokes (eg 'my name is Staines - Seaman Staines'). Airman is not much used in BE either. And neither airman nor seaman would necessarily imply militaire.
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top