'TH' sound after 'T' or 'D'

riyanswat

Senior Member
Pashto
How to pronounce the words in which one ends with 'T' sound and the next one starts with 'TH' sound?
I mean we have to pronounce both the T and TH in fast conversations?
It's so difficult.
For example: Scrap/t/ through, post thread etc.
The 'TH' is preceded by 't' sound and it's so difficult.
Can anyone help me, please?
 
  • dojibear

    Senior Member
    English - Northeast US
    Since you can't pronounce both consonants together, you have to allow a small pause (unvoiced) between them.

    "Post thread" isn't a good example of T+TH, because it has 3 consonants (S+T+TH). So I will say "hat thrower". When I say that, I say the T and the TH, but they are separate. There is a very small pause between them: just enough to switch from the T position to the TH position.

    There are many situations like this, with other consonant pairs. "Big time", "wide belt", etc. You simply allow a small pause between syllables.

    You are correct to know there is usually no pause between words: "hat attack" is spoken as "ha-ta-tak".
     

    tunaafi

    Senior Member
    English - British (Southern England)
    There is no pause in my dialect. For 'hat thrower', my tongue goes up to the alveolar ridge doe the /t/, which is not exploded. my tongue then slides rapidly back the short distance to the normal contact point for /θ/, and moves away as the fricative sound is produced.,
     

    riyanswat

    Senior Member
    Pashto
    Since you can't pronounce both consonants together, you have to allow a small pause (unvoiced) between them.

    "Post thread" isn't a good example of T+TH, because it has 3 consonants (S+T+TH). So I will say "hat thrower". When I say that, I say the T and the TH, but they are separate. There is a very small pause between them: just enough to switch from the T position to the TH position.

    There are many situations like this, with other consonant pairs. "Big time", "wide belt", etc. You simply allow a small pause between syllables.

    You are correct to know there is usually no pause between words: "hat attack" is spoken as "ha-ta-tak".
    In "hat thrower", you could use the glottal 'T'. For example, "Ha/?/ thrower", which is fine, you can understand. But as in "scrap/t/ through", when you use the glottal T as ending sound of scrape, it will become present tense and I'm talking about past.
    So I'll have to allow a small pause. :p
    Thank you for your assistance. It's quite noteworthy.
     

    riyanswat

    Senior Member
    Pashto
    There is no pause in my dialect. For 'hat thrower', my tongue goes up to the alveolar ridge doe the /t/, which is not exploded. my tongue then slides rapidly back the short distance to the normal contact point for /θ/, and moves away as the fricative sound is produced.,
    Could you please tell me which accent do you have?
     

    kentix

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    /t/, which is not exploded.
    That's a key point - it's an unreleased t at the end of a word. It's not the same t as at the beginning of a word - like top.

    It's not post(a) thread.

    You say post, and when you come to the t your tongue is pressed to the top of your mouth just behind your teeth. You leave it there and cut off all airflow out of your mouth for a moment. So for a moment absolutely nothing is happening. No parts of your mouth are moving and no air is moving. Your tongue is pressed upward and your throat is closed and tight. You can feel the tension at the base of your jaw and neck. That is the end of the word "post". The t comes to a stop and does not continue.

    After that suitable short pause you then pronounce the word thread. It's not too hard because you are starting from a dead stop and all you have to do is relax the tension in your mouth and move the tip of your tongue down to the back of your teeth to make the th sound.
     

    riyanswat

    Senior Member
    Pashto
    That's a key point - it's an unreleased t at the end of a word. It's not the same t as at the beginning of a word - like top.

    It's not post(a) thread.

    You say post, and when you come to the t your tongue is pressed to the top of your mouth just behind your teeth. You leave it there and cut off all airflow out of your mouth for a moment. So for a moment absolutely nothing is happening. No parts of your mouth are moving and no air is moving. Your tongue is pressed upward and your throat is closed and tight. You can feel the tension at the base of your jaw and neck. That is the end of the word "post". The t comes to a stop and does not continue.

    After that suitable short pause you then pronounce the word thread. It's not too hard because you are starting from a dead stop and all you have to do is relax the tension in your mouth and move the tip of your tongue down to the back of your teeth to make the th sound.
    Is this the "held T" in the end of first word?
     
    Agreeing with tuna, forero and others, there is really no pause or attempt to have two different consonants in 'hat thrower.' The final part of the first 't' disappears. Another, simpler, example: It thinks (said of a robot). The first t starts to materialize (and then doesn't quite), but the phrase voicing is without break.
    This is like the cockney, 't' in 'butter.'

    The "post thread" and other examples above are more complicated; compounding of consonants, but I'd argue that little more is heard, first sylllable, than 'pos'
     
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