than is generally known

whitecap

Senior Member
chinese
At this time, we need to remember our strengths. Counterterrorism is extraordinarily difficult, but we’re likely better at it than we think, and we have more resources committed to it than is generally known. ("Ottawa Parliament shooting: We've known this day was coming" Oct 23 2014 CBC News)




we have more resources committed to it(=counter terrorism) than
____ is generally known.



Which should I put in ?
it (dummy)?
 
  • PaulQ

    Banned
    UK
    English - England
    Why do you think there is a word missing?

    You seem to have given the example from a legitimate website: "...we have more resources committed to it than is generally known." and then you wish to add a word: we have more resources committed to it than ____ is generally known. :confused:
     

    whitecap

    Senior Member
    chinese
    I am doing this so that I can understand the sentence correctly.

    1)we have more resources committed to it than it is generally known.
    2)we have more resources committed to it than we are generally known.

    Since there is "is" not "are", I thought it would be "it" , but I am not sure.

    What do you think?





     

    Biffo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    "We have more resources committed to counterterrorism than is generally known."

    I am guessing that your difficulty comes from wondering what is the subject of the verb "is" in that sentence. Am I right?
     

    whitecap

    Senior Member
    chinese
    "We have more resources committed to counterterrorism than is generally known."

    I am guessing that your difficulty comes from wondering what is the subject of the verb "is" in that sentence. Am I right?


    Yes, Biffo.:)
     

    Biffo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    Yes, Biffo.:)
    I sympathise with you. I find it difficult to justify that sentence. I would tend to write, "We have more resources committed to counterterrorism than are generally known about."

    Let's see if someone else can give a satisfactory answer! :)

    P.S.
    Adding another "it" would not help to make the sentence any more grammatical.
     
    Last edited:

    RM1(SS)

    Senior Member
    English - US (Midwest)
    I agree with Biffo that it should say are, not is. If I were forced to add a word to the sentence (which, as others have said, is fine as is), I would use what.
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top