Thank God it's FRIDAY!

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Lara2005

New Member
Philippines, Filipino-Tagalog
"THANKs GOD IT's FRIDAY!" In tagalog we say it "Salamat Diyos ko
Biyernes na!"

I love saying it every friday.. If your an outgoing person, you absolutely know why. Actually, I am not saying it.. I am shouting on it!

Can anyone help me, how will you say this in all different language?

I want to learn more.. mucho gracias! :)
 
  • Chazzwozzer

    Senior Member
    Turkish
    "THANKs GOD IT's FRIDAY!" In tagalog we say it "Salamat Diyos ko
    Biyernes na!"

    I love saying it every friday.. If your an outgoing person, you absolutely know why. Actually, I am not saying it.. I am shouting on it!

    Can anyone help me, how will you say this in all different language?

    I want to learn more.. mucho gracias! :)
    Thank God it's Friday must be correct. :)

    TGIF is not a popular saying in Turkish, so I can't give you an equivalent. However, I've seen this translated as "Tanrıya şükür cuma geldi." and "Tanrıya şükür bugün cuma.", of course they don't really express a strong enthusiasm like in English. I think Friday is not that important for us, eh? :)

    Oh, I've just remembered this: "Yaşasın! Yarın tatil!" (Hooray! Tomorrow is holiday!") I am used to hear at school, or even at a primary school, they might say: "Ole! Yarın tatil!" which expresses the same thing but with a Spanish exclamation, I think kids use it more often!

    P.S: "Çok şükür bu haftanın da sonunu getirdik." nasıl bir karşılık olur, arkadaşlar? :p
     

    dinis.dinis

    Senior Member
    USA/English
    In the expression "Thank God", THANK functions as an imperative like saying, "! Dele gracias a Dios!" whereas, "Thanks!", when it takes an "s" and is used by itself, constitutes, quite simply, a plural noun indicating "las gracias".
    It may seem like a small point but it sounds very ungrammatical to native English speakers.

    I am hoping you understand Spanish. Here in Los Angeles, most of the "filipinas" I meet are nurses. and, for whatever reason, they seem all to know some Spanish. My family is always saying,"Thank God, they've assigned me a "filipina" nurse".
    We don"t consider them really "filipinas" but, rather, just angels which have descended from heaven!l

    God bless your Homeland,
    Dinis
     

    aurette

    Senior Member
    Romanian Romania - Transylvania
    In Romanian, the exact translation would be:
    Mulţumesc lui Dumnezeu e vineri! However, Romanians never say this.
    We would rather say Ce bine că-i vineri!
    :)
     

    Lara2005

    New Member
    Philippines, Filipino-Tagalog
    Thank God it's Friday must be correct. :)

    TGIF is not a popular saying in Turkish, so I can't give you an equivalent. However, I've seen this translated as "Tanrıya şükür cuma geldi." and "Tanrıya şükür bugün cuma.", of course they don't really express a strong enthusiasm like in English. I think Friday is not that important for us, eh? :)

    Oh, I've just remembered this: "Yaşasın! Yarın tatil!" (Hooray! Tomorrow is holiday!") I am used to hear at school, or even at a primary school, they might say: "Ole! Yarın tatil!" which expresses the same thing but with a Spanish exclamation, I think kids use it more often!

    P.S: "Çok şükür bu haftanın da sonunu getirdik." nasıl bir karşılık olur, arkadaşlar? :p
    Hi Chazzwozzer, thank you for your help, I truly appreciate it. Btw, sorry I don't understand this message "Çok şükür bu haftanın da sonunu getirdik." nasıl bir karşılık olur, arkadaşlar?" Can you translate it for me in English. I have a friend from Istanbol and his nice, but we don't undersatnd each other if he started to speak turkish language. :) sometimes, he was saying to me something that's sounds like "kukurukuku" hehehe funny! I don't know how to say it. :)
     

    Frank06

    Senior Member
    Nederlands / Dutch (Belgium)
    Hi,
    "THANKs GOD IT's FRIDAY!" In tagalog we say it "Salamat Diyos ko Biyernes na!"
    I love saying it every friday.. If your an outgoing person, you absolutely know why. Actually, I am not saying it.. I am shouting on it!
    Can anyone help me, how will you say this in all different language?
    I want to learn more.. mucho gracias! :)
    The expression is hardly used in Dutch.
    Literally translated it would be:
    "Godzijdank, het is vrijdag!"

    Groetjes,

    Frank
     

    StefKE

    Senior Member
    French - Belgium
    In French, it is not really common either and one would say:

    'Merci [mon] Dieu, c'est vendredi' or 'Dieu merci, c'est vendredi' though the second one sounds much better, it sticks less to English. The difference between 'Merci Dieu' (hardly ever used) and 'Dieu merci' is quite difficult.
     

    Chazzwozzer

    Senior Member
    Turkish
    Hi Chazzwozzer, thank you for your help, I truly appreciate it. Btw, sorry I don't understand this message "Çok şükür bu haftanın da sonunu getirdik." nasıl bir karşılık olur, arkadaşlar?" Can you translate it for me in English. I have a friend from Istanbol and his nice, but we don't undersatnd each other if he started to speak turkish language. :) sometimes, he was saying to me something that's sounds like "kukurukuku" hehehe funny! I don't know how to say it. :)
    "Çok şükür bu haftanın da sonunu getirdik." nasıl bir karşılık olur, arkadaşlar?
    How would "Thank God we've made ends meet this week, as well!" be an equivalent, guys?

    Thank God it's Friday actually expresses relaxing and commonly partying over the weekend, because working time is finally ended. In my equivalent, there's also an expression of relief, however, not because the work week is ended and partying time has come, but because they could manage to survive financially till the weekened. I would expect to hear it from family guys of lower-middle or upper-lower classes in Turkey. In both expressions, they thank God on Friday for different reasons! :)
     

    Lara2005

    New Member
    Philippines, Filipino-Tagalog
    In the expression "Thank God", THANK functions as an imperative like saying, "! Dele gracias a Dios!" whereas, "Thanks!", when it takes an "s" and is used by itself, constitutes, quite simply, a plural noun indicating "las gracias".
    It may seem like a small point but it sounds very ungrammatical to native English speakers.

    I am hoping you understand Spanish. Here in Los Angeles, most of the "filipinas" I meet are nurses. and, for whatever reason, they seem all to know some Spanish. My family is always saying,"Thank God, they've assigned me a "filipina" nurse".
    We don"t consider them really "filipinas" but, rather, just angels which have descended from heaven!l

    God bless your Homeland,
    Dinis
    Hola, Cómo está usted? Thank you for your compliments to my "kababayan". Yes, I understand basic spanish language and I want to learn more. I learned it from school, because before it's a part of University curriculum here. If you heard about the history of Ferdinand Magellan of Spain, trying to colonized natives, where he was killed in the Island of Mactan that now known as the Philippines. That's why most of the people in visayas region they are proficient in speaking and writing spanish language.

    Again, Thank you so much!

    Otra vez, Gracias tanto! (correct me if I'm wrong)

    Maraming salamat ulit! It's how we say it in Tagalog.
     

    betulina

    Senior Member
    català - Catalunya
    In Catalan the literal translation is "Gràcies a Déu que és divendres!", but it's not that common to my knowledge. I would say "Que bé que ja és divendres!", which would translate something like "Good! It's Friday!" :)
     

    zena168

    Member
    US
    ROC Mandarin
    There’s no such expression in Chinese that I know of. I don’t know about now, but when I was still a kid people had to work and go to school on Saturdays.
     

    Becker

    Member
    English
    Thanking God is rarely if ever used in the Sinhalese language (possibly because most of the people are Buddhists). The sense of relief that it is Friday would be:

    ati yantam sikuraadaa!
     

    Flaminius

    coclea mod
    日本語 / japāniski / יפנית
    Neither in Japanese does one refer to god when the relief comes with Friday.
    花金 (hanakin) short for 花の金曜日 (hananokin'yoobi)

    今日は花金だ。うれしいな。

    Today's Friday of flowers. How wonderful.
     

    Chazzwozzer

    Senior Member
    Turkish
    Bu soruyu cuma günü cevaplayabilir miyim? Daha gerçekçi olması açısından...:D
    Seems like I should expand my category of Turkish TGIF to university students! LOL

    Neither in Japanese does one refer to god when the relief comes with Friday.
    花金 (hanakin) short for 花の金曜日 (hananokin'yoobi)

    今日は花金だ。うれしいな。

    Today's Friday of flowers. How wonderful.
    Is it relief of the fact that work week is ended or something else? What do flowers have to do with Friday, by the way? :)

    Thanking God is rarely if ever used in the Sinhalese language (possibly because most of the people are Buddhists). The sense of relief that it is Friday would be:

    ati yantam sikuraadaa!
    How would you translate that into English?
     

    ucraniana

    Member
    Ucrainian
    "THANKs GOD IT's FRIDAY!" In tagalog we say it "Salamat Diyos ko
    Biyernes na!"

    I love saying it every friday.. If your an outgoing person, you absolutely know why. Actually, I am not saying it.. I am shouting on it!

    Can anyone help me, how will you say this in all different language?

    I want to learn more.. mucho gracias! :)
    In Russian we say: Слава Богу! (Уже) Пятница!" = "God glorious, it's Friday (already)", though it's not a common speech formula.

    BR
     

    linguist786

    Senior Member
    English, Gujarati & Urdu
    URDU:

    الله كا شكر ہے کہ آج جمعه ہے!۔
    (Allah kaa shukar hai ke aaj jumaa hai!)

    HINDI:

    भगवान का शुकर है के आज शुक्रवार है!
    (Bhagvaan kaa shukar hai ke aaj shukrawaar hai!)

    GUJARATI:

    અલ્લાહ નો શુકર છે કે આજે શુક્રવાર છે!
    (Allah no shukar che ke aajay shukrawaar che!)

    The words for "God" can change according to the religion - Urdu-speaking people are more likely to be Muslim, hence they use the word "Allah", but it could change to "Bhagvaan" if Hindu people say it. Similarly in Gujarati, speakers can be both Hindu or Muslim, so the word can change. I've used "Allah" since that is what we say at home..

    Similarly, the word for "Friday" varies according to the religion - in Urdu, Muslims would definitely say "jumaa". In Hindi, people would most likely say "shukravaar". In Gujarati, it depends on the religion - Muslims can both say "shukravaar" or "jumaa" (even though, strictly speaking, "jumaa" isn't the correct Gujarati word). Basically, if you hear somebody say "jumaa", they are more likely to be Muslim, and if you hear "shukravaar", they could be of any religion. (inc. Muslims)

    Hope all that is clear.. :)
     

    knakts

    New Member
    Latvia
    In Latvian it would be "Paldies dievam, piektdiena ir klāt!". We have a pub named like that so it also has made it more popular. ;)
     

    alitza

    Senior Member
    Romania, Romanian
    In Romanian, the exact translation would be:
    Mulţumesc lui Dumnezeu e vineri! However, Romanians never say this.
    We would rather say Ce bine că-i vineri!
    :)
    We would also say (and I do, every Friday!) : "Slava Domnului ca e vineri!", (literally: "Praise the Lord that it's Friday!) which is more common and closer to the English version.
     

    avalon2004

    Senior Member
    UK- English/Spanish
    I've never heard this in Greek but the translation would be something like "δόξα τω Θεώ- είναι πια Παρασκευή" (dhóksa to theó- íne pya paraskeví) or more likely "είναι επιτέλους Παρασκευή" (íne epitéloos paraskeví).
     
    Does it simply mean "Thank God it's Friday?"

    So the Finnish use this expression just like English-speaking world huh?
    Yes, it's translated word for word. And to my mind, Finns don't use it that frequently. My guess is that the expression has recently been loaned from English through American TV Shows. I can't think of any purely Finnish counterpart for it.
     

    MissPrudish

    Senior Member
    Greek
    I've never heard this in Greek but the translation would be something like "δόξα τω Θεώ- είναι πια Παρασκευή" (dhóksa to theó- íne pya paraskeví) or more likely "είναι επιτέλους Παρασκευή" (íne epitéloos paraskeví).
    I haven't heard it in Greek too, I guess it's not used like the english version but the examples you have are right. You could also say δόξα τω θεώ ήρθε (επιτέλους) η Παρασκευή! which means thank god friday (finally) came but it's not a 'standard' phrase we say like in english.
    It just could have been used.
     

    MissPrudish

    Senior Member
    Greek
    With what? No it wouldn't I don't think.. at-least not in the way I use it. "Mashallah" is used when someone's done something good. Like:

    "I got excellent exam results!"
    "Oh Mashallah, well done!"
    Yes, we use it that way too in Cyprus.
    Can you explain us why you thought it could be used? I'm really confused:confused:
     

    linguist786

    Senior Member
    English, Gujarati & Urdu
    Yes, we use it that way too in Cyprus.
    Can you explain us why you thought it could be used? I'm really confused:confused:
    It wasn't me.. it was panjabigator. Panjabigator isn't actually a Muslim so maybe he was a little unsure of how it would be used? (meaning, he might have thought it could also be used to show gratitude to God - hence "Thank God it's Friday". lol maybe..)
     

    MissPrudish

    Senior Member
    Greek
    It wasn't me.. it was panjabigator. Panjabigator isn't actually a Muslim so maybe he was a little unsure of how it would be used? (meaning, he might have thought it could also be used to show gratitude to God - hence "Thank God it's Friday". lol maybe..)
    Ah sorry, wrong quote then.
    By the way, I am not Muslim too but we use this word the way you said...
    But I see what you mean anyways.
     

    janek

    Member
    Polish, Poland
    Translation to Polish would be:

    Dzięki Bogu, dziś piątek!

    I didn't hear it used in here though. In the past, when people used to work on Saturdays, we had a common enough expression uttered at the end of the working day:

    Po sobocie, po robocie (Saturday's gone, job's done)
     

    minengiz

    New Member
    turkish-turkey
    Thank God it's Friday must be correct. :)

    TGIF is not a popular saying in Turkish, so I can't give you an equivalent. However, I've seen this translated as "Tanrıya şükür cuma geldi." and "Tanrıya şükür bugün cuma.", of course they don't really express a strong enthusiasm like in English. I think Friday is not that important for us, eh? :)

    Oh, I've just remembered this: "Yaşasın! Yarın tatil!" (Hooray! Tomorrow is holiday!") I am used to hear at school, or even at a primary school, they might say: "Ole! Yarın tatil!" which expresses the same thing but with a Spanish exclamation, I think kids use it more often!

    P.S: "Çok şükür bu haftanın da sonunu getirdik." nasıl bir karşılık olur, arkadaşlar? :p
    I often use "yaşasın, bugün cuma!"(Hooray, today is friday!).
    And i think that it fits well.
     

    Lemminkäinen

    Senior Member
    Norwegian (bokmål)
    Which language is that bb3ca201? :)

    In Norwegian we say (and this is a regular expression) endelig fredag or endelig helg - "finally Friday/weekend".

    I think the latter's the most common, and you hear it (understandably enough) when the workday/school is over.
     

    elroy

    Imperfect Mod
    US English, Palestinian Arabic bilingual
    (Colloquial Palestinian) Arabic:

    نشكر الله إنو اليوم الجمعة
    Nushkor Alla inno 'l-yoom il-jum'a

    I did not provide a standard translation because this is something that would most likely be said in a colloquial context.
     

    kusurija

    Senior Member
    Lithuania Czech
    In Czech:
    Hurá, už je pátek! (hooray, it's (alredy) Friday). In my humble opinion, it isn't frequently used in Czech. More word-to-word translation: Díkybohu, (konečně/finally) už je pátek!

    In Lithuanian:
    Ačiū dievui/valio, pagaliau penktadienis! (Thank God/hooray, finally it's FRIDAY!) In my humble opinion, it isn't frequently used in Lithuanian.
     

    cepeele

    New Member
    Spanish - Chile
    A tradução literal em Português é "Graças a Deus é sexta-feira".
    Mas quando chega sexta, quase todo mundo diz "Ainda bem que hoje é sexta", em inglês seria "Even fine it's friday".
     

    bibax

    Senior Member
    Czech (Prague)
    In Bohemia we usually don't thank God for such things like Fridays.

    We simply say Konečně je pátek (= Finally it's Friday).

    It reminds me of the French movie "Vivement Dimanche!" (Finally Sunday!
    , F. Truffaut).

    Maybe "Vivement vendredi!" could also work in French.
     

    Encolpius

    Senior Member
    Hungarian
    After reading all the comments I started to think of the literal translation of the Hungarian version and did not sound very idiomatic, I don't know why. We in Hungary would say: Végre péntek! (Finally it's Friday). As usual full of e's. :)
     

    hollabooiers

    Member
    Estonian
    In Estonian the literal translation would be "Tänu jumalale, et on reede!", but that's pretty much never used. What we do say is "Õnneks on lõpuks ometi reede!" (literally: fortunately it's finally Friday).
     
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