Thanks Man

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melasa

Senior Member
English & Spanish, USA born
In the United States, instead of being formal and replying to someone by saying, “Thanks Sir,” we have an informal way of saying it, which is, “Thanks Man.”

The word reference dictionary has:

Tío
Mano

I know when I was in Spain, Tío was definitely the equivalent of man, and I used to hear “Mano” for Mexicans, but I don’t really hear it that much anymore.

What would you use?

What is used in Mexico most often?

Thanks,
 
  • fenixpollo

    moderator
    American English
    This is regional as well as generational, much the way man, dude, mate, buddy, and similar words are used in English. So you’ll find people who use tío, che, hermano (or its contraction ‘mano), as well as güey, depending on their age and their dialect.

    Here are some related threads that may help. To find them, I had to scroll through the list of previous threads at the bottom of the dictionary entry for man.

    Man
    man ¿amigo/tio?
     

    melasa

    Senior Member
    English & Spanish, USA born
    I was just watching a movie in Spanish with English Subtitles. Chapo: el escape del Siglo
    One of the Columbian drug smugglers talking to another simply used:

    “Hombre”
     

    Circunflejo

    Senior Member
    Castellano de Castilla
    I know when I was in Spain, Tío was definitely the equivalent of man
    As @fenixpollo said, it depends on age and dialect. In Spain, tío is the most usual coloquial way for man but there are other ways like, for example, tronco and, as you said later, hombre is used too although this one is more formal.

    One of the Columbian drug smugglers talking to another
    Are you sure that they were Columbian and not Colombian?
     

    melasa

    Senior Member
    English & Spanish, USA born
    As @fenixpollo said, it depends on age and dialect. In Spain, tío is the most usual coloquial way for man but there are other ways like, for example, tronco and, as you said later, hombre is used too although this one is more formal.



    Are you sure that they were Columbian and not Colombian?
    As @fenixpollo said, it depends on age and dialect. In Spain, tío is the most usual coloquial way for man but there are other ways like, for example, tronco and, as you said later, hombre is used too although this one is more formal.



    Are you sure that they were Columbian and not Colombian?
    Mistake...they were ColOmbian

    ColUmbian refers to America or the United States

    Thanks for catching that
     

    melasa

    Senior Member
    English & Spanish, USA born
    This is regional as well as generational, much the way man, dude, mate, buddy, and similar words are used in English. So you’ll find people who use tío, che, hermano (or its contraction ‘mano), as well as güey, depending on their age and their dialect.

    Here are some related threads that may help. To find them, I had to scroll through the list of previous threads at the bottom of the dictionary entry for man.

    Man
    man ¿amigo/tio?
    Is there a difference between “büey” and “güey”....I don’t understand “güey” and how that came about...someone please educate me
     
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