Thanks or thank

Tatyana Penn

New Member
Russian
Hello everyone,

Here is a sentence: "Thanks to parents for giving me birth/life". Is it correct?

Or may I simply write "thank my parents for ..." like "thank you for something" ?
And is it possible to use just "birth" instead of "giving me birth"?

Thanks for you help.
 
  • Tatyana Penn

    New Member
    Russian
    Florentia52, "Thanks to parents for giving me birth" is a complete corrected sentence, so to speak :) A person wants to express his thanks to parents, that's all. Maybe it will be an inscription on a gift or somewhere else.

    The initial sentence was "thank my parents for my birth" that's why I ask if this variant is also possible.
     

    Myridon

    Senior Member
    English - US
    The initial sentence was "thank my parents for my birth" that's why I ask if this variant is also possible.
    "Thanks" in your first sentence is a noun. (I would like to give my) thanks to my parents..." (I would like to) thank my parents for giving birth to me. "Thank" is a verb so "Thank my parents..." seems to be an imperative telling someone else to thank your parents.
    Technically, only your mother gave birth to you. Though you could get away with it as is, it might be better to thank both of them for giving you life.
    "... for my birth" seems a little odd like your birth is something that exists now and that it was something they paid for rather than something that they did. I'd like to thank my parents for my new bicycle and my birth. ;)
     

    Tatyana Penn

    New Member
    Russian
    Myridon, thank you)) variant with the verb is clear now :tick:
    But as for the noun, do I understand correctly that I may omit "I would like to give" in the sentence "I would like to give my thanks to my parents for..."?
    If I understand right this phrase is supposed to be an inscription somewhere, and person doesn't want it to sound like a speech.
     

    Myridon

    Senior Member
    English - US
    If I understand right this phrase is supposed to be an inscription somewhere, and person doesn't want it to sound like a speech.
    Almost any inscription is going to be a shorter form of a longer sentence. If the gift is inscribed with just "Gift" or "Vase" or whatever it is, you could say it means "This is a gift.", "This is a vase.", etc.
     
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