That camera cost me a bomb

supermarioutd

Senior Member
Persian
Hello to all,

Let's say you buy a camera that is very expensive. Is it natural and common to say this? :

That camera cost me a bomb but it has been really worth it.

I remember I once read somewhere that this expression of cost a bomb is a bit old-fashioned. Is it? Would it be strange to use it?
 
  • Cenzontle

    Senior Member
    English, U.S.
    I've never heard it, but I can tell from the context that it means it cost a lot.
    Slang often comes and goes out of style quickly.
     

    supermarioutd

    Senior Member
    Persian
    And can this expression be used in other situations?

    What do you say about these other examples of this idiom?

    Eating at that restaurant costs a bomb.

    That dinner last night cost a bomb

    These days holding a wedding ceremony costs a bomb
     

    JulianStuart

    Senior Member
    English (UK then US)
    And can this expression be used in other situations?

    What do you say about these other examples of this idiom?

    Eating at that restaurant costs a bomb.

    That dinner last night cost a bomb

    These days holding a wedding ceremony costs a bomb
    Those all use the expression correctly, but, as noted, it is not common in AE and may be a little old-fashioned in BE these days (as slang usage frequently is short-lived). I have no idea how widely it is still used in the UK, but it doesn't sound "strange" to my ears:)
     

    S1m0n

    Senior Member
    English
    "Cost a bomb" implies a greater expense than a single meal, to me. It's an expression you'd use for a significant investment. I wouldn't use it for a restaurant meal, no matter how expensive. A very elaborate wedding would qualify. Also, it should be said that this is a boast. The speaker wants everyone to know how much he spent, and that he could afford it.
    Finally, modern reality is that if you're non-white, you might need to be careful about where you say the word 'bomb'. In some places (airports) you can even get arrested for using the word.
     

    JulianStuart

    Senior Member
    English (UK then US)
    "Cost a bomb" implies a greater expense than a single meal, to me. It's an expression you'd use for a significant investment. I wouldn't use it for a restaurant meal, no matter how expensive. A very elaborate wedding would qualify. Also, it should be said that this is a boast. The speaker wants everyone to know how much he spent, and that he could afford it.
    Finally, modern reality is that if you're non-white, you might need to be careful about where you say the word 'bomb'. In some places (airports) you can even get arrested for using the word.
    In the appropriate context it simply means a large, nay exorbitant, sum of money and a meal costing £5,000 or ¥500,000 (including wine and wagyu at $500 a pop, just for the beef) for two would definitely qualify :D
    In the OP, I'd agree with you .
    Also, it should be said that this is a boast. The speaker wants everyone to know how much he spent, and that he could afford it.
    In other contexts, it might be used to imply someone wasted their money on something - the common thread being the notion of "a large amount of money"
    And for anyone in an airport, your advice is good :eek:
     
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