that is to leave out

hly2004

Banned
chinese
Hi, everyone:



Your reviewer's mind wandered, as she explored ways of not reading this book. Surely, she thought, books are like people, who can be unknown to us, or heard of, or “skimmed” (perhaps met) or forgotten, but never truly known? But that is to leave out love—for people and for books.


Could you tell me the idea of italic part?

http://www.economist.com/books/displ...ry_id=10130740

I know the phrases in the italic part, but I still cannot comprehend it.

Best wishes
 
  • Dimcl

    Senior Member
    Canadian English
    It means that the attitude she describes doesn't take into account her love for people and for books. This passage is rather "tongue in cheek". The reviewer is feeling lazy (or tired) and doesn't really feel like reading the book. She tries to justify not reading it by comparing books to people she's never met or has never truly known even if she has met them. But then she decides that her love for people and books must outweigh her current apathy.
     

    hly2004

    Banned
    chinese
    Thank you, Dimcl :-)
    I understand your explanation about "that is to leave out love—for people and for books."

    Still, I think that “who.."is a clause then why there's a question mark at the end of the sentence. That's I the part I cannot understand.

    I would write:

    Your reviewer's mind wandered, as she explored ways of not reading this book. Surely, she thought, books are like people, who can be unknown to us, or heard of, or “skimmed” (perhaps met) or forgotten, but never truly known.
     

    nichec

    Senior Member
    Chinese(Taiwan)/English(AE)
    Thank you, Dimcl :-)
    I understand your explanation about "that is to leave out love—for people and for books."

    Still, I think that “who.."is a clause then why there's a question mark at the end of the sentence. That's I the part I cannot understand.

    I would write:

    Your reviewer's mind wandered, as she explored ways of not reading this book. Surely, she thought, books are like people, who can be unknown to us, or heard of, or “skimmed” (perhaps met) or forgotten, but never truly known.
    There's a reason why the writer put a question mark after "never truly known", it serves as her (or his?) doubt about things mentioned in the article.

    At least that's the way I read it.
     

    hly2004

    Banned
    chinese
    There's a reason why the writer put a question mark after "never truly known", it serves as her (or his?) doubt about things mentioned in the article.

    At least that's the way I read it.
    Hi:
    I tend to agree with you until I see "surely". :)
     

    nichec

    Senior Member
    Chinese(Taiwan)/English(AE)
    Well, I have said all I have to say on this matter in your 2 threads.

    That's the way I read it, others may disagree.
     
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