'That little factory of yours, Charlie, is as close as any of us is ever going to get.'

MrRise

Senior Member
Russian
"That little factory of yours, Charlie, is as close as any of us is ever going to get."

The context of it is: (Film Charlie And the Chocolate Factory) Grandpa of Charlie told him that factory closed forever, and no one sees as Willy Wonka comes in or out, and that all worker has been fired. But one day they saw smoke rising from the chimneys. Also about Charlie's facotry. He make a model of Mr.Wonka's Factory from caps of tooth pasta.

So what does one of his grandfathers mean? And I even don't realise how verb "get" works here. Maybe his Grandpa meant that as they can't get in the real facotry to work there, or jsut to see inside, as they also can't get in that small factory, because of it's small? But get has so many meanings, and if I look for get in a dictionary, I think I'll be confused (because in russian it can be 78 meanings), so please explaim me what Grandfather means and how to understand the meaning of get here.

(Edited so that the sentence the question is about is in the message box, not just the thread title. -- JustKate, English Only moderator)
 
  • xqby

    Senior Member
    English (U.S.)
    I'm going with "get" in the sense of: to come to a specified place; arrive; reach -- to get home late. #18 in the Word Reference dictionary.

    They are close to the little factory, in a physical sense. It's there on their table where they can touch it. They will never be close enough to the actual factory to touch it.
     

    JustKate

    Moderate Mod
    Grandpa is saying that there is no chance that they'll ever get inside the real factory. The closest any of them will ever get to the real chocolate factory is the little model that Charlie made.

    Get can mean many things, as you know. But here it's being used pretty literally to mean "come."

    (Cross-posted with xqby)
     

    suzi br

    Senior Member
    English / England
    I am not even sure what the grandfather says. You need to put it into your post as well as in your header.

    I think we are looking at "That little factory of yours, Charlie, is as close as any of us is ever going to get"

    To get close to something is a set phrase meaning to be close to something. In the sentence you quote the word order has been jumbled about, but the overall thing means "your little factory is as close as we are going to get .. " (to something, I am not sure what, presumably something he mentioned immediately before this.)
     

    MrRise

    Senior Member
    Russian
    Grandpa is saying that there is no chance that they'll ever get inside the real factory. The closest any of them will ever get to the real chocolate factory is the little model that Charlie made.

    Get can mean many things, as you know. But here it's being used pretty literally to mean "come."

    (Cross-posted with xqby)
    So grandfather means that the only one factory they can get is Charlie's model?
    But I can't get the structure of the sentencce "That little factory of yours, Charlie, is as close as any of us is ever going to get. For me it means like:
    So Charlie's factory is close to them, so (as..as) means that if Charlie's factory is close to them, they can get to the actual factory! Logic! And grandfather would be right if the model of Charlie wasn't close, was far away, somewhere where they can't touch it or see. Then they also won't be able to get to the actual factory!
    What does construction as...as mean here? I know that like 2 multiply by 2 as equal as 2 plus 2, but here...
     

    JustKate

    Moderate Mod
    So grandfather means that the only one factory they can get is Charlie's model?
    But I can't get the structure of the sentencce "That little factory of yours, Charlie, is as close as any of us is ever going to get. For me it means like:
    So Charlie's factory is close to them, so (as..as) means that if Charlie's factory is close to them, they can get to the actual factory! Logic! And grandfather would be right if the model of Charlie wasn't close, was far away, somewhere where they can't touch it or see. Then they also won't be able to get to the actual factory!
    What does construction as...as mean here? I know that like 2 multiply by 2 as equal as 2 plus 2, but here...
    I'm not sure I entirely understand your question, but perhaps it will help if I explain that Grandpa isn't just talking about literal distances here. What he means is that even though the real factory is right in the same town they all live in, there's no chance they will ever be allowed inside the real factory. The play factory that Charlie made out of toothpaste caps is the nearest they will ever come (or ever get) to the real factory.

    They can see and touch the little play factory that Charlie made. But they will never be allowed inside the real factory - or so Grandpa believes.
     

    MrRise

    Senior Member
    Russian
    I'm not sure I entirely understand your question, but perhaps it will help if I explain that Grandpa isn't just talking about literal distances here. What he means is that even though the real factory is right in the same town they all live in, there's no chance they will ever be allowed inside the real factory. The play factory that Charlie made out of toothpaste caps is the nearest they will ever come (or ever get) to the real factory.

    They can see and touch the little play factory that Charlie made. But they will never be allowed inside the real factory - or so Grandpa believes.
    Yes, I understand all the meaning, but I see the cunstruction as...as there. And I relly can't get what for it's here.
    For example knowing the meaning, and I also watch the russian version, grandfather said: "The only one thing we have is your toy (or play? I thought it's a verb or a noun, not an adjective?) factory Charlie."

    You explained very well, and I got all the meaning, and now I wonder in the origignal sentence. For what purpose "as..as" is there? (You know, as quite as a mouse and etc.) And it's unclear how factory can be as close as they can ever come to the actual factory. I mean, if they can come Charlie's factory, but can't come to actual factory, and it's quite clear. But how can it work together (as..as)?
     

    JustKate

    Moderate Mod
    Yes, I understand all the meaning, but I see the cunstruction as...as there. And I relly can't get what for it's here.
    For example knowing the meaning, and I also watch the russian version, grandfather said: "The only one thing we have is your toy (or play? I thought it's a verb or a noun, not an adjective?) factory Charlie."

    You explained very well, and I got all the meaning, and now I wonder in the origignal sentence. For what purpose "as..as" is there? (You know, as quite as a mouse and etc.) And it's unclear how factory can be as close as they can ever come to the actual factory. I mean, if they can come Charlie's factory, but can't come to actual factory, and it's quite clear. But how can it work together (as..as)?
    Ah, I think I understand now. (Maybe. Let's see! :)) In this case, the as...as construction isn't being used in the same idiomatic way that it is in "as quiet as a mouse," where it's used to "express similarity or equality between one person or thing and another" (as the WordReference Dictionary puts it: definition). In your example, it's just indicating degree or amount: as near as you can, as far as possible or as close as we are going to get. That's the very first definition in the WR dictionary.

    And yes, play can be an adjective, where it indicates that the item, in this case a factory, is a small version that children can play with. I didn't want to call it a toy factory since it's hard for me to think of something made of the lids of toothpaste tubes as a "toy," and also because "toy factory" can mean "a factory that makes toys." It probably would have been better if I called it "a model of a factory," really - that's much more precise.
     

    MrRise

    Senior Member
    Russian
    Ah, I think I understand now. (Maybe. Let's see! :)) In this case, the as...as construction isn't being used in the same idiomatic way that it is in "as quiet as a mouse," where it's used to "express similarity or equality between one person or thing and another" (as the WordReference Dictionary puts it: definition). In your example, it's just indicating degree or amount: as near as you can, as far as possible or as close as we are going to get. That's the very first definition in the WR dictionary.

    And yes, play can be an adjective, where it indicates that the item, in this case a factory, is a small version that children can play with. I didn't want to call it a toy factory since it's hard for me to think of something made of the lids of toothpaste tubes as a "toy," and also because "toy factory" can mean "a factory that makes toys." It probably would have been better if I called it "a model of a factory," really - that's much more precise.
    I read more and found, that as clsoe as you'll is an idiom, means that something is look like something. Can it be an idiom here? Because if yes, I will understand it like: an idiom to be as close as means the only one thing we can have/do/get is (that little facotry), so is it an idiom here?
    Can it work? And this little bicycle is as close as I'm going to have?! = this bicycle is the one thing I can have now.
     

    Myridon

    Senior Member
    English - US
    I read more and found, that as clsoe as you'll is an idiom, means that something is look like something. Can it be an idiom here? Because if yes, I will understand it like: an idiom to be as close as means the only one thing we can have/do/get is (that little facotry), so is it an idiom here?
    Can it work? And this little bicycle is as close as I'm going to have?! = this bicycle is the one thing I can have now.
    I'd like to have an expensive motorcycle, but I can't afford even a cheap motorcycle. This bicycle of mine is as close as I'm going to get to owning an expensive motorcycle.
    There is a journey from point A to B to C to D.
    A) Walking............ B) Bicycle ..................... C) Cheap motorcycle ................................. D) Expensive Motorcycle
    I started here ....... I got to here .................. I probably won't get here ........................... I'll never get here.

    I will never get any closer to D than B. B is as close to D as I will get.
     

    MrRise

    Senior Member
    Russian
    I'd like to have an expensive motorcycle, but I can't afford even a cheap motorcycle. This bicycle of mine is as close as I'm going to get to owning an expensive motorcycle.
    There is a journey from point A to B to C to D.
    A) Walking............ B) Bicycle ..................... C) Cheap motorcycle ................................. D) Expensive Motorcycle
    I started here ....... I got to here .................. I probably won't get here ........................... I'll never get here.

    I will never get any closer to D than B. B is as close to D as I will get.
    So... this construction of to be close as something is going to get or you/I/we will get used (or is used?) when something could be better, but now or forever it's the only one thing we can get/have/do. Right?

    It's complex to me, but I'm going to try to create some sentences, then will you say are they right? :)
    That cheap smart phone is as close as I'm going to have.
    This little flat is as close as I'm ever going to get.
    Or this big summer trip is as close as my family will get.

    Are they right? So if they are, this consturction will get clear for me and in the future I will use and understand it. Hope I got the meaning!
     

    Myridon

    Senior Member
    English - US
    It's complex to me, but I'm going to try to create some sentences, then will you say are they right? :)
    That cheap smart phone is as close as I'm going to have get to having a supercomputer.
    This little flat is as close as I'm ever going to get to having a palace.
    Or this big summer trip is as close as my family will get to going to Mars.
    In the original post, we have context which allows us to fill in the missing words "to the real factory." Your sentences are incomplete.
     

    MrRise

    Senior Member
    Russian
    In the original post, we have context which allows us to fill in the missing words "to the real factory." Your sentences are incomplete.
    I guess, it has no equivalent in my language, but..I probably see now the meaning.
    And the meaning is: this construction used when a speaker wants to say that he/she has a minimum from they really would like to have.
    For example about me: A computer simulator is as close, as I'm going to have (or get?) a real quadracopter. Is it right? I want to say, that I really want to have a quadracopter, but I can't afford it, then I can use a qudracopter simulator to satisfy myself, but still wish to have a real model.
     

    Myridon

    Senior Member
    English - US
    From the WordReference dictionary on "get":
    18 to come to a specified place; arrive; reach:[no object]to get home late.
    From the WordReference dictionary on "close":
    13 being near in space or time; nearby:[be + ~ (+ to + object)]Our apartment is close to the train station. Winter must be close; it's gotten colder.
    You can "get close" to something. You cannot "have close" to something.

    A...B...C
    A is as close to B as C is.
    ABC
    A is as close to C as it can get (because it can't be on top of B). It cannot get any closer. It cannot move to a place that is closer to C than the place it is now.
     

    MrRise

    Senior Member
    Russian
    From the WordReference dictionary on "get":

    From the WordReference dictionary on "close":

    You can "get close" to something. You cannot "have close" to something.

    A...B...C
    A is as close to B as C is.
    ABC
    A is as close to C as it can get (because it can't be on top of B). It cannot get any closer. It cannot move to a place that is closer to C than the place it is now.
    It's quite clear to me about close in:" A is as close as B to C". And get got to me clear.
    So... what's the general meaning of to be as close as somebody will/is going to get (=reach) something?
     

    Myridon

    Senior Member
    English - US
    It's quite clear to me about close in:" A is as close as B to C". And get got to me clear.
    So... what's the general meaning of to be as close as somebody will/is going to get (=reach) something?
    If A can move closer to C, it can get closer to C than it is now.
    If A cannot move closer to C, it is as close to C as it can get.
     

    MrRise

    Senior Member
    Russian
    If A can move closer to C, it can get closer to C than it is now.
    If A cannot move closer to C, it is as close to C as it can get.
    Oh..I can't get the second sentence, even if I will change get into reach, what to reach? What can A reach?
    Yes, if A can move closer to C, it will be be closer that it's now. If A cannot, it will be as it is now (without any moving closer).

    So If A cannot move closer to C, it is as close to C as it can get. - is unclear. Exaclly this part: it is as close to C as it can get. What do I have to do to understand it? :(
     

    RM1(SS)

    Senior Member
    English - US (Midwest)
    We will never get closer to the real thing.
    This is the closest we will ever get.
    This is as close as we will ever get.
     

    MrRise

    Senior Member
    Russian
    We will never get closer to the real thing.
    This is the closest we will ever get.
    This is as close as we will ever get.
    We will never get closer to the real thing. (Clear) This is the closest we will ever get. (Clear) This is as close as we will ever get. (And I can't believe! Is it clear? Yes!)
    Now it seems to me that I got at last!
    As this third sentence was short, I think I got the meaning. And also that all three sentences have quite similar meaning.
    In fact, I can translate both two first sentences literally, so it's easy. But third cannot be translated literally. But the meaning of it is: "All we can do, is..."
    Then second and third one sentences can replace each other.

    Then about my first sentence: "That little factory of yours, Charlie, is as close as any of us is ever going to get." Can be changed into "That little factory of yours, Charlie, is the closest any of us is ever going to get".

    But what if I add to the real factory? Or it doesn't have to be? Or even must not to be? Because then I can't get the real meaning.

    "That little factory of yours, Charlie, is as close as any of us is ever going to get to the real facotry". - "That little factory of yours, Charlie, is the closest any of us is ever going to get to the real factory". Hm.. maybe I got though. Like your little factory is the one thing we can have as real factory to get. Or something like that.
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top