that most dreaded of all consequences

NewAmerica

Senior Member
Mandarin
Does "that most dreaded of all consequences" mean "that most of scientists are afraid of all consequences"?

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Nevertheless, most scientists seem to prefer as a practical matter that science should stay clear of religious issues. Perhaps this is a good strategy for those who wish to avoid conflicts between science and religion, which might lead to less public acceptance of science, not to mention that most dreaded of all consequences—lower funding. However, religions make factual claims that have no special immunity from being examined under the cold light of reason and objective observation.

-Victor J. Stenger

Source: God, the Failed Hypothesis 10
 
  • JulianStuart

    Senior Member
    English (UK then US)
    Lower funding is the consequence that they fear the most (they dread it the most). There may be various other consequences, and not all of them will necessarily be feared.
     

    NewAmerica

    Senior Member
    Mandarin
    Yes. Both of you used "the" before "most", which makes things far easier to understand. Yet the original text has "that most dreaded." So I guess that "that" = "the".

    Am I on the right track?

    Thank you. :)
     

    Glenfarclas

    Senior Member
    English (American)
    "That" is a pronoun (or technically an adjective?) in this sentence, not a conjunction, if that's what you're asking. It's the same as it would be in "that man over there."
     

    suzi br

    Senior Member
    English / England
    In conversation “that” would be said slightly differently in your example, compared to:
    Not to mention that she hadn’t even asked for permission.
     

    NewAmerica

    Senior Member
    Mandarin
    Thank you.

    What is the function of "that" (in "not to mention that most dreaded of all consequences")? What does it mean?
     
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