That no project ()whatever shall be entertained with regard to her, without being submitted to us

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park sang joon

Senior Member
Korean
The narrator recalls his adolescence.
He was an apprentice for Mr. Spenlow.
He and Mr. Spenlow's only daughter Dora fell in love with each other, but after Mr. Spenlow's sudden death, she moved in with her two aunts and confined herself there.
He made an appointment with Dora's aunts to visit them through correspondence and came Dora's aunts' house with his best friend Traddles.
Miss Lavinia and Clarissa are Dora's aunts; Miss Lavinia, the younger one took the lead in this conversation.

..............
'That no project whatever shall be entertained with regard to our niece, without being first submitted to us -' 'To you, sister Lavinia,' Miss Clarissa interposed.
'Be it so, Clarissa!' assented Miss Lavinia resignedly - 'to me - and receiving our concurrence. We must make this a most express and serious stipulation, not to be broken on any account.
[David Copperfield by Charles Dickens]
I think "whatever shall be entertained with regard to our niece" is a parenthetical adverbial clause.
So I'd like to know if "should be" is omitted after "project."
Thank you in advance for your help.
 
  • Cagey

    post mod (English Only / Latin)
    English - US
    Whatever may be a pronoun and introduce a relative clause, but here it's an adjective and modifies 'project', the word it follows. It means "of any kind" [definition 8].

    Miss Lavinia is saying that no project [of any kind] that has to do with their niece will be considered unless it is first presented to the sisters so that they can decide whether to approve it.
     

    park sang joon

    Senior Member
    Korean
    Thank you, Cagey, for your so very helpful answer. :)
    Then I was wondering I can rephrase "That no project whatever~," as "That no whatever project~."
     

    Glasguensis

    Signal Modulation
    English - Scotland
    In modern English we often go straight for the more intense form "whatsoever" in sentences like these - if you look at that word you will see lots of examples of how it is used.
     
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