That stupid bugger

bellotojuanfra

Senior Member
Español-Extremeño-Badajoz
I know the meaning of "bugger" but my question is if this term is also used in US, because i think it's a Br. use.

Thanks in advance
 
  • Arrius

    Senior Member
    English, UK
    Creo que se refiere sólo a la sodomía en EEUU. En inglaterra además de su significado literal, quiere decir granuja o hasta sólo hombre - He's a funny bugger (Es un tío muy raro) - y se usa incluso por niños traviesos (Come here, you little bugger!") También es una palabrota que se usa cuando algo no va bien, menos fuerte que ¡Joder!
     

    Arrius

    Senior Member
    English, UK
    Bugger could be use (rude way) as gay?
    You are a bugger = Tu eres un maricón....
    Not very often these days, though possibly more in the USA, because the word has been so much used in the other senses given above, and there are so many synonyms that may be used instead, some quite gross, some less so, and some merely technical designations
    The author Oscar Wilde. most unwisely, took Lord Roseberry to court for calling him a sodomite, which is the same thing. But that was long, long ago, though any educated Anglo-Saxon would still know what it means.
     

    laydiC

    Senior Member
    Puerto Rico, USA spanglish
    4.bugger

    British slang.

    <i>vb.</i> the act of committing sodomy
    <i>n.</i> person who commits sodmoy (n.), ie. has anal intercourse.

    It is generally used about an annoying person or situation.
    Bugger off (get lost).
    Stop buggering me.
    My boss is a bugger and a half.
    Oh bugger (something went wrong).


    as opossed to:


    7.Bugger

    N. A person or animal, often a small one, such as a child or small pet. Frequently prefaced by "little."

    American slang

    (particularly rural), not to be confused with the British cuss word.
    He's a cute little bugger.She's a tough little bugger.


    from my always reliable source...urbandictionary.com:thumbsup:


    ps: another meaning for bugger is also :

    A nasal scraping derived from inhaled soil and mixed with nasal secretions and dried. (jejej...basically mucus... in the US):eek:
     

    Arrius

    Senior Member
    English, UK
    Stop buggering me laydic
    Sounds as if this protest was left rather too late!
    The American expression I have heard, as a Liimey who has yet to visit your great country, where my son has just been granted US citizenship, is Quit bugging me! which I have never associated with buggery, but rather with pesky bugs = irritating flying insects, in plain English.
    The comparatively innocent kind of use of bugger on both sides of the pond may be influenced by and merge with the quite innocent beggar (pordiosero) which is a bit oldfashioned now, as in lucky/ silly/ poor/ daft beggar or bugger!
    No one has yet mentioned Go to buggery! which is a coarse euphemism for Go to hell!
    <i>n.</i> person who commits sodomy (ibid)
    is a sodomite not a sodomy which is only the act not the person..
     

    laydiC

    Senior Member
    Puerto Rico, USA spanglish
    Stop buggering me is British Arrius.. (it appears under british slang...)

    You'll never hear that expression said by an American...

    Bugger in the US is either mucus ( a nasty bugger) or a little bugger meaning a kid or a small animal or something of the sort...
     

    nightlone

    Senior Member
    Eng.UK
    "Stop buggering me!"... hmm, I don't think I've ever said that (thankfully), but "Stop bugging me", yes.

    By the way, I thought that solidified nasal mucus was called "booger(s)" in the US. Here they are called "bogeys/bogies" (not sure about the spelling).
     

    Arrius

    Senior Member
    English, UK
    It seems to me that bogies are the wheels under a railway carriage, whereas bogeys are frightful spectres or solidified snot, which is also a little alarming,(apart from look-alikes of the hero of Casablanca, I suppose).
     

    txpaddler

    Senior Member
    United States - English
    Most educated North Americans would understand "buggery" to refer to sodomy, although I doubt that even one in ten of my freshmen college students would understand the word.
     

    LaLoquita

    Senior Member
    American English
    By the way, I thought that solidified nasal mucus was called "booger(s)"
    Yes, they're boogers (pronounced with the "oo" as in book, not with the "u" as in bug. As the mother of 4, I am well acquainted with my little buggers' boogers! LOL
    And we also call children "little boogers" sometimes. Isn't that lovely!
     

    Arrius

    Senior Member
    English, UK
    Most educated North Americans would understand "buggery" to refer to sodomy, although I doubt that even one in ten of my freshmen college students would understand the word.
    In the Woodie Allen film, "All you ever wanted to know about sex, but never dared to ask", a vet, played by Gene Wilder falls in love with a very pretty little ewe (female sheep) brought to his surgery by its shepherd all the way from Albania. This particular aberration is referred to in the picture as sodomy although it was essentially bestiality. Thus it would appear that some Americans are confused about this term as well, possibly including the very sophisticated and talented Mr Allen.
     
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