That..., that

sunyaer

Senior Member
Chinese
Self-made sentence"

"There are still errors that he makes again, that you have pointed out before."

I use two "that" here, does the sentence sound right to you? If not, how to rephrase?
 
  • dreamlike

    Senior Member
    Polish
    You can leave out the first 'that', it's not necessary. Also, I'd expect 'again and again'. The sentence as it is sounds a bit awkward.
     

    Liam Lew's

    Senior Member
    I would say, "There are still errors you've pointed out before, that he makes again.", if I wanted to include all the segments you used. But I think the sentence could be written much simpler, but for that I need to know more context and the exact meaning you want to convey. Is the first part "There are still errors" really needed. What does it refer to?
     

    wandle

    Senior Member
    English - British
    What is the purpose of the question?

    Is it (1) to find a good way to express the idea in that sentence?

    Or is it (2) to ask whether two relative clauses introduced by 'that', and referring to the same thing, can be placed side by side in a short sentence?
     

    Liam Lew's

    Senior Member
    What is the purpose of the question?

    Is it (1) to find a good way to express the idea in that sentence?

    Or is it (2) to ask whether two relative clauses introduced by 'that', and referring to the same thing, can be placed side by side in a short sentence?
    To whom is the question adressed??
     
    Last edited:

    sunyaer

    Senior Member
    Chinese
    What is the purpose of the question?

    Is it (1) to find a good way to express the idea in that sentence?

    Or is it (2) to ask whether two relative clauses introduced by 'that', and referring to the same thing, can be placed side by side in a short sentence?

    I am asking both of these questions.
     

    wandle

    Senior Member
    English - British
    The answer to question (2) is 'Yes'.
    However, the original sentence is unfortunately not well expressed and is not a good example.
    It contains rather a lot of redundancy for such a short sentence.

    A better way to express the idea is:
    'He is still making errors that you have pointed out to him'.

    If you wish to keep 'before', a change of tense is needed:
    'He is still making errors that you pointed out before'.

    If you wish to keep the present perfect, a change of adverb is needed:
    'He is still making errors that you have already pointed out'.
     
    Last edited:

    sunyaer

    Senior Member
    Chinese
    I am trying to capture spoken, not good written English, which even though might be wordy, is natural.

    The second "that" has been replaced with "which":

    "There are still errors that he makes again, which you have pointed out before."

    Comments?
     

    wandle

    Senior Member
    English - British
    "There are still errors that he makes again, which you have pointed out before."
    Comments?
    Putting 'which' for 'that' avoids repeating 'that' (the repeated 'that' was not wrong), but my earlier comment still applies:
    However, the original sentence is unfortunately not well expressed and is not a good example.
    It contains rather a lot of redundancy for such a short sentence.
     

    Forero

    Senior Member
    Changing the second that to which makes it refer not to the errors but to the fact that he still makes errors. For something close to that meaning I would use as instead of which.
     
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