that which they are comprised of

LeFouAmericain

Member
USA - English
J'essaie de traduire cette phrase: In the future, the types of families will change, but that which they are comprised of - that will never change

"A l'avenir, les types de familles changeront, mais <?>, ca ne changera jamais."

I need some help with the middle part of this.

Merci bien!
 
  • A.D.

    Senior Member
    English, Canada
    Hello LeFouAmericain,

    By the middle part, do you mean "mais"? If so, that simply means "but".

    AD.
     

    LMorland

    Senior Member
    American English
    In the future, the types of families will change, but that which they are comprised of - that will never change.
    I'm just another American -- crazy or not -- and so you shouldn't put too much stock in what I say. I was attracted to this thread because it contains an error in English that is, unfortunately, all too common: the use of "comprised" in place of "composed." (You can say, "the group comprises members from all the European countries," or "the group is composed of members...." but not "comprised of:cross:")

    Cela dit, je suggère : Au futur, les types de familles changeront, mais leur essentiel ne changera jamais.

    Que disent les francophones ?
     

    tilt

    Senior Member
    French French
    I'm just another American -- crazy or not -- and so you shouldn't put too much stock in what I say. I was attracted to this thread because it contains an error in English that is, unfortunately, all too common: the use of "comprised" in place of "composed." (You can say, "the group comprises members from all the European countries," or "the group is composed of members...." but not "comprised of:cross:")

    Cela dit, je suggère : Au futur, les types de familles changeront, mais leur essentiel ne changera jamais.

    Que disent les francophones ?
    Leur essence would work better than leur essentiel.

    Nonetheless, I suggest a translation closer to the original: À l'avenir, les types de familles changeront, mais ce dont elles sont faites ne changera jamais.
     

    polaire

    Senior Member
    English, United States
    Just a guess:

    "but that which they are composed of"

    ""mais en quoi qu'ils existent?"
     

    jann

    co-mod'
    English - USA
    LMoreland said:
    I was attracted to this thread because it contains an error in English that is, unfortunately, all too common: the use of "comprised" in place of "composed." (You can say, "the group comprises members from all the European countries," or "the group is composed of members...." but not "comprised of:cross:")
    Indeed LMorland has identified a point of current debate in English. Some people accept this usage; others do not. The contention is even noted in the dictionary: see here for a quick and accessible summary of the issue.
     

    LMorland

    Senior Member
    American English
    Indeed LMorland has identified a point of current debate in English. Some people accept this usage; others do not. The contention is even noted in the dictionary: see here for a quick and accessible summary of the issue.
    I would argue that it's not a matter of debate; that Merriam-Webster is simply recording current bad usage in the U.S. But this discussion belongs on the English-only board, and I started one here: http://forum.wordreference.com/showthread.php?p=2781858#post2781858

    You'll see that not everyone agrees with me!
     
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