That's all for now.

  • sokol

    Senior Member
    Austrian (as opposed to Australian)
    What's the context?

    Because in this case answers could vary hugely, depending on context.
    Let's suppose you say this in a restaurant; in German you might just say "Danke!" and the waiter will know that you have no further wishes, for now. But there are contexts where other translations may be required.
     

    Encolpius

    Senior Member
    Hungarian
    I'm a little bitt surprised. I think it's quite a common idiom and I can imagine a lot of contexts. But then, maybe there is no similar German idiom.
    Let's say, I am writing a letter to a friend and just write it at the end of the letter. I think it's usual to say it when you finish a conversation, saying information.
     

    sokol

    Senior Member
    Austrian (as opposed to Australian)
    I'm a little bitt surprised. I think it's quite a common idiom and I can imagine a lot of contexts. But then, maybe there is no similar German idiom.
    Let's say, I am writing a letter to a friend and just write it at the end of the letter. I think it's usual to say it when you finish a conversation, saying information.
    The point is that English idioms do not translate 1:1 to German idioms.

    To finish a letter you definitely could NOT use just "Danke". :) In that case something different is required, like:

    - Das wär's dann erst einmal.

    The point is, to use this as a closing note of a letter does not contain essentially meaning - it only is a way of ending the letter, of which there are many possible ways in German.
    For this you could even use:

    - Für heute will ich aber Schluss machen.

    Which just indicates that you might have to add more later but that for now this is all.

    You could use many other wordings for this (and many different wordings are used by native speakers :)).
    I don't think that there's a "single most-used equivalent phrase" for this English idiom.
     
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