That's all = Period?

NHHL

Senior Member
Singapore-English
"John really hates it when someone stands over his shoulder while he's texting, on the computer, or just standing over him period"

- Are "That's all ", "That's it" and "period" interchangeable in this context?

Thanks so much!

NHHL
 
  • Copyright

    Senior Member
    American English
    Think of it as "at all" -- "or just standing over him at all." In this case, it also means "at any time, for any reason."
     

    entangledbank

    Senior Member
    English - South-East England
    No, you can't use those alternatives. 'Period' here is a spelling out of the AmE name of the punctuation mark: also called a full stop or full point. The speakers is contrasting:

    He hates someone standing over him while he's texting.
    He hates someone standing over him.

    The punctuation mark is spoken in the second to make clear that it's unqualified. You could also say 'or just (plain) standing over him'.
     

    Wishfull

    Senior Member
    Japanese
    "John really hates it when someone stands over his shoulder while he's texting, on the computer, or just standing over him period"

    - Are "That's all ", "That's it" and "period" interchangeable in this context?

    Thanks so much!

    NHHL
    Hi.
    May I understand that
    "John really hates it when someone stands over his shoulder while he's texting, on the computer, or just standing over him period"
    and
    "John really hates it when someone stands over his shoulder while he's texting, on the computer, or just standing over him."
    are identical?


    So what is the context/background of the original sentence?
    Such as;
    The writer spoke to his secretary, who typed exactly what he said. And the secretary typed "period" instead of "." carelessly?
     

    entangledbank

    Senior Member
    English - South-East England
    No, it's a colloquial way of saying "without any qualification", and it's usually said after a longer description. For example, I might say I don't like eggs in salads; in fact I don't like eggs, period. I'm taking back the qualification 'eggs in salads' and saying that in fact I could have ended the sentence there: 'I don't like eggs.', and that would have been just as correct.
     

    Copyright

    Senior Member
    American English
    Just to expand on EB's good explanation -- and fine egg-salad example -- I'll reword the original sentence just so Wishfull is clear. I believe there are three actions, so it would read like this:
    "John really hates it when someone stands over his shoulder while he's texting, or when he's on the computer -- or just standing over him, period (no matter what he's doing)."

    Note the comma before "period" -- there is a slight pause before the finality of saying "period." Also note that you can use the BE "full stop" in the same sense: I don't like David Copperfield; in fact, I don't like magicians, full stop. (Or "period.")
     
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