That's an alternate. This would supersede the other if you want it to

taraa

Senior Member
Persian
Robert is a heir of a corporation. His father just died.

Robert: What is in the safe?
Uncle: Something for you. Maurice always said it was his most precious gift to you-A will. Maurice's will is with Port and Dunn.
Uncle: That's an alternate. This would supersede the other if you want it to. It splits up the component businesses of Fisher Morrow.
Inception, movie

I can't understand the bolded parts. Can you please explain it?
 
  • taraa

    Senior Member
    Persian
    Maurice wrote more than one will. The latest version will be considered legally valid if Robert wants to contest the other will in a court of law.
    Aha, I understand. Thank you. :)
    By "that's an alternate", he means that that is not the latest version, please?
     

    Edinburgher

    Senior Member
    German/English bilingual
    There are two wills, "that one" and "this one". That one is with Port and Dunn (presumably a firm of lawyers), this one is here in the safe.
    He is saying that one is an alternate (meaning an alternative to this one). "Alternate" doesn't tell us which one is the latest version, it only tells us that they are different.

    cross-posted
     

    Linkway

    Senior Member
    British English
    Although 'alternate' (verb) and 'alternating' (adjective) mean something quite different (and are pronounced quite differently), 'alternate' as a noun is often used the same as the noun 'alternative'.
     

    taraa

    Senior Member
    Persian
    Aha, I understand. Thank you all for the good explanation. :)

    But is its grammar correct, please? Shouldn't it be either of these?
    1. This would supersede the other if you wanted it to
    2. This will supersede the other if you want it to
     

    owlman5

    Senior Member
    English-US
    Shouldn't it be either of these?
    Screenwriters and native English speakers don't typically worry about the grammar of conditional statements, Taraa. This is a very big deal to ESL students and teachers for some reason.

    There's certainly no need to copy the conditional statement in that dialog. Hopefully, you will get to the point in your own studies where you realize that some variation in grammar is common in spoken English.
     
    Last edited:

    taraa

    Senior Member
    Persian
    Screenwriters and native English speakers don't typically worry about the grammar of conditional statements, Taraa. This is a very big deal to ESL students and teachers for some reason.

    There's certainly no need to copy the conditional statement in that dialog. Hopefully, you will get to the point in your own studies where you realize that some variation in grammar is common in spoken English.
    I understand. Thank you again, Owlman. :)
     
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