The “weeping and gnashing of teeth” <are><is>…

Alexander2

Senior Member
Russian
Should the phrase “weeping and gnashing of teeth” take a plural or a singular verb?

Matthew 13:42 mentions the “weeping and gnashing of teeth.” The “weeping and gnashing of teeth” are also mentioned at Matthew 24:51; 25:30.

Matthew 13:42 mentions the “weeping and gnashing of teeth.” The “weeping and gnashing of teeth” is also mentioned at Matthew 24:51; 25:30.
 
  • Alexander2

    Senior Member
    Russian
    I do not know what others are posting on the forum. The original texts read:

    Matthew 13:42: “And they will pitch them into the fiery furnace. There is where their weeping and the gnashing of their teeth will be.”

    Matthew 24:51: “And he will punish him with the greatest severity and will assign him his place with the hypocrites. There is where his weeping and the gnashing of his teeth will be.”

    Matthew 25:30: “And throw the good-for-nothing slave out into the darkness outside. There is where his weeping and the gnashing of his teeth will be.’”
     

    PaulQ

    Banned
    UK
    English - England
    I do not know what others are posting on the forum.
    The point is that the linked post has an explanation that is relevant to your query. As it happens "wailing and gnashing of teeth" is a phrase that is similar in nature to "egg and bacon" and "fish and chips". It is therefore worthwhile going to the link.
     
    Last edited:

    Alexander2

    Senior Member
    Russian
    Based on what is stated in the link, is it correct to treat the phrase as a singular unit?

    Matthew 13:42 mentions the “weeping and gnashing of teeth.” The “weeping and gnashing of teeth” is also mentioned at Matthew 24:51; 25:30.
     

    PaulQ

    Banned
    UK
    English - England
    Based on what is stated in the link, the question you must ask yourself is
    "Is "The weeping and gnashing of teeth” a single unit, or are "The weeping" and "the gnashing of teeth" separate items?"

    You will note that you have included the whole phrase in one set of quotation marks.
     
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