the abbreviated form of AH

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eli7

Senior Member
Persian (Farsi)
In 10 A.H. (632 A.D.) the Christians of Najran refused to accept Islam.

How should I read this sentence in a non-abbreviated form?

ten after the Hijra
tenth of anno hegirae
tenth year of the Hijra
or what?
 
  • reno33

    Senior Member
    English - USA
    ten after the Hijra :cross: ---should be ten years......
    tenth of anno hegirae:cross:
    tenth year of the Hijra:tick:

    There are several ways, but #s 1 and 2 above are definitely wrong.
     
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    eli7

    Senior Member
    Persian (Farsi)
    tenth year of the Hijra:tick:
    Thanks a ton :)

    If it must be read "tenth", then shouldn't it be written like "in 10th AH ...."?
    Is there any other way to say "ten", instead of tenth?

    And, on the tenth of the Hijra is correct or in the tenth of Hijra?
     

    eli7

    Senior Member
    Persian (Farsi)
    I would say "in the tenth year after the Hijra" or"in the tenth year following the Hijra".
    That's where I got confused.
    What does AH stand for? I surfed the net and I just could find "Anno Hegirae" which I am sure nobody uses it when they are resding that sentence.
     

    PaulQ

    Banned
    UK
    English - England
    This is interesting:
    Hijrah | History, Definition, & Importance

    It was Umar I, the second caliph, who in the year 639 ce introduced the Hijrah era (now distinguished by the initials AH, for Latin anno Hegirae, “in the year of the Hijrah”). ʿUmar started the first year AH with the first day of the lunar month of Muḥarram, which corresponds to July 16, 622, on the Julian calendar.
    It appears "Hijra" is used both as the journey and as an era. I assumed that it was only the journey (I suspect most non-Islamic readers will make the same mistake.)

    And, "No, nobody says "anno Hegirae"."
     
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    reno33

    Senior Member
    English - USA
    AH = "Anno Hegirae" which is a Latin phrase (similar to AD) .......denoting the Muslim Calendar year. The "H" of course, stands for "hegira" (various spellings) which is the year of Muhammad's "emigration" from Mecca to Medina and which marks the first year of the Muslin calendar.
     

    Myridon

    Senior Member
    English - US
    If it must be read "tenth", then shouldn't it be written like "in 10th AH ...."?
    Dates are written in a "code" which doesn't represent how they are read in words. We might write the month first but say the month second, we might add a th/nd/rd where there's not one written, etc.

    AH is a attempt to follow the pattern of AD "anno domini" which was originally written before the number.
    "In the year of our Lord 10" = AD 10, but twenty years earlier was 10 BC with the letters after.
    Over time, people have tended to put both AD and BC after the number. We just say "AD" - we wouldn't read out the words or translate them into English.

    You should treat them more as symbols than as abbreviations that should somehow be read in the order they are written.
     

    eli7

    Senior Member
    Persian (Farsi)
    AH = "Anno Hegirae" which is a Latin phrase (similar to AD)
    Yeah I know, But for example in BC, we read it like "before the Christ", not the Latin version of it.
    My question is that should I say Anno Hegirae or in the year of the Hijra?
     

    eli7

    Senior Member
    Persian (Farsi)
    We just say "AD" - we wouldn't read out the words or translate them into English.

    You should treat them more as symbols than as abbreviations that should somehow be read in the order they are written.
    Do you mean that I should say /eɪ eɪtʃ / ?? Then it would be in tenth of /eɪ eɪtʃ /, right?
     
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    reno33

    Senior Member
    English - USA
    Yeah I know, But for example in BC, we read it like "before the Christ", not the Latin version of it.
    My question is that should I say Anno Hegirae or in the year of the Hijra?
    Actually, we don't "say" Before Christ.....we say "BEE SEE". We also say AD like (AY DEE).

    AH should be said "AY AYCH) but even if you say "After Hijra" (or more correctly - "the year of the Hijra) almost no one in the USA will know what you're talking about....you'd have to explain everything from the start.
     
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    PaulQ

    Banned
    UK
    English - England
    even if you say "After Hijra" almost no one in the USA will know what you're talking about....you'd have to explain everything from the start.
    This is true of the UK also: who is your intended audience?
     

    Myridon

    Senior Member
    English - US
    Yeah I know, But for example in BC, we read it like "before the Christ", not the Latin version of it.
    My question is that should I say Anno Hegirae or in the year of the Hijra?
    We ordinarily just read BC and AD as the letters.
    Do you mean that I should say /eɪ eɪtʃ / ?? Then it would be in tenth of /eɪ eɪtʃ /, right?
    You should say 10 /eɪ eɪtʃ /. (no "of" unless you say "year of <the whole thing>"). We say "10th of <month>" to mean "the tenth day of <month>" but we don't say "10th of <era/decade/century>" to mean "the tenth year of <whatever>".
     

    eli7

    Senior Member
    Persian (Farsi)
    An
    You should say 10 /eɪ eɪtʃ /. (no "of" unless you say "year of <the whole thing>"). We say "10th of <month>" to mean "the tenth day of <month>" but we don't say "10th of <era/decade/century>" to mean "the tenth year of <whatever>".
    So, 10th of the year is incorrect, but 10th year of something is correct. Right?
    And, in "10th year of (the) Hijrah", should the article "the" be present of omitted grammatically?
     

    reno33

    Senior Member
    English - USA
    Really? Interesting, because here we try to read the full versions of the abbreviations.
    Where's "here"?? English is famous for its love of the abbreviation and modern English for its love of acronyms
     
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