The agent priced the house at the right level for the market

caireo

Senior Member
Tibetan
"The agent priced the house at the right level for the market."

Hi, what's the meaning of the highlight in the above sentence? Is it a set phrase?

And there is also another instance:"I can't help thinking that if we could write code at the right level of abstraction, then we won't need TDD or even Unit Testing."

Does "at the right level..." have the same meaning in these two sentences?

Thank you. :)
 
  • cuchuflete

    Senior Member
    EEUU-inglés
    Hi caireo,
    I don't think it's a set phrase. It means at a level at which buyers would either purchase the house, or at least make an offer to begin a price negotiation.
     

    caireo

    Senior Member
    Tibetan
    Thank you, cuchuflete.

    For the first sentence:"The agent priced the house at the right level for the market." Is it correct to say: "The agent priced the house at the same level of the market."?

    Thank you.
     

    JamesM

    Senior Member
    When it comes to house prices, there is no one level. In a single neighborhood there are various levels for different types and sizes of houses. The agent set the price for the house consistent with prices in that market, but it does not mean it was identical to the price of another house in the same area.
     

    cuchuflete

    Senior Member
    EEUU-inglés
    No, caireo, that would be both unidiomatic and factually unclear. For items such as stock or equity shares in public companies, there is often an immediate "spot" market, at which buy and sell transactions can occur almost instantaneously. Housing is much more complicated as a rule. The market or the level of the market (we don't say it that way) are not precise points. They are ranges or approximations.

    To price something at a market level, or 'at the market', may imply a number of different things. It may be an agent's attempt to set a house price that will lead to a very quick transaction. It may be an attempt to price the house at the high end of the range of recent transaction prices for similar properties, thus leading to the probability of a prompt offer. In this case the offer may be below the asking price, and begin a period of counter offers.

    There is, for most housing, no such thing as the same level as the market, unless you are speaking of multiple identical properties all sold within a very short time period. Even if we assume that a block of apartments have all recently sold at XXXX (units of some currency), setting a short-term market level for identical units, we would still not say "at the same level of the market". A more idiomatic phrase would be "at market price" or "at market level".
     

    Thomas Tompion

    Senior Member
    English - England
    The agent priced the house at the right level for the market would be understood, but the idea would be more commonly expressed the agent priced the house realistically.

    The agent priced the house at the same level as the market (or at the market level) would mean that the house ought to have sold within a reasonable time at the price set: that the price set by the agent reflected accurately the state of the market.

    If he priced it high we'd probably say something like The agent priced the house unrealistically high (or too high).

    If he priced it low we'd probably say something like The agent priced the house too low.
     
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