the apple Adam offered Eve wasn’t really much bigger, if any, than one of our orange pippins

longxianchen

Senior Member
chinese
Hi,
Here are some words from the novel Lady Chatterley's Lover(page 344, chapter 16) by Lawrence (planetebook,here):
(background: Clifford read from a book to Connie:“The universe shows us two aspects: on one side it is physically wasting, on the other it is spiritually ascending.” Then Connie said……)

‘Physically wasting?’ she said. ‘I see you getting fatter, and I’m sot wasting myself. Do you think the sun is smaller than he used to be? He’s not to me. And I suppose the apple Adam offered Eve wasn’t really much bigger, if any, than one of our orange pippins. Do you think it was?’

I feel the sentence in blue not easy to understand. Now I rephrase the sentence this way:
the wisdom apple(=the apple) Adam offered Eve was only a little bigger(=wasn't really much bigger), if (there is really) any (apples), than one of our orange pippins.

Is it right please?
And is the apple the same thing as orange pippin ? Is an orange pippin an apple which is like an orange?

Thank you in advance
 
  • GreenWhiteBlue

    Senior Member
    USA - English
    As a side note, the Book of Genesis does not call the fruit that Eve offered to Adam (and not the other way around, as Connie says here) an "apple." The reason that apples are associated with that fruit is because of a play on words in Latin. The fruit in question was that borne by the tree of the knowledge of good and evil. The Latin word for "evil" is written as malum -- but malum also happens to be how one writes the word for "apple". The difference is only found in pronunciation; malum meaning "evil" has a short "a", and malum meaning apple has a long "a."
     

    bennymix

    Senior Member
    Nice point, Green. And for that matter, there is no mention in Gen 1 or 2 of a man named Adam. The Hebrew word for 'man' is 'adam'. "Let us make man [ha adam] in our image." [1:26] Then, "God created man [ha adam] in his image." [Gen 1:27].

    In-Depth Look at Translation of Hebrew Word Adam

    So all the way through Genesis 1–3 we have ha-adam and our English Bibles usually translate it as “man” or “the man.” Some translations give “Adam” for ha-adam in Genesis 2:19 or 2:20. In Genesis 3:17 and Genesis 3:21 we have adam (with no ha), which most English Bibles translate as “Adam.” [NRSV prefers 'man' here as well]


    As a side note, the Book of Genesis does not call the fruit that Eve offered to Adam (and not the other way around, as Connie says here) an "apple." The reason that apples are associated with that fruit is because of a play on words in Latin. The fruit in question was that borne by the tree of the knowledge of good and evil. The Latin word for "evil" is written as malum -- but malum also happens to be how one writes the word for "apple". The difference is only found in pronunciation; malum meaning "evil" has a short "a", and malum meaning apple has a long "a."
     
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