The apple doesn’t fall far from the tree

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High on grammar

Senior Member
Farsi
Hello everyone:

Is it possible to use this expression to convey a negative meaning?

As in: he seems to have sticky fingers. I guess the apple doesn't fall far from the tree.

Thanks
 
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    Senior Member
    American English
    He seems to have sticky fingers. I guess the apple doesn't fall far from the tree.

    If you say this, you mean that he takes after his father (usually) because his father was known for having sticky fingers. (I haven't heard "sticky fingers" in a long time, for what it's worth – but then I haven't heard "the apple doesn't fall far from the tree" for a very long time, either.)
     

    High on grammar

    Senior Member
    Farsi
    He seems to have sticky fingers. I guess the apple doesn't fall far from the tree.

    If you say this, you mean that he takes after his father (usually) because his father was known for having sticky fingers. (I haven't heard "sticky fingers" in a long time, for what it's worth – but then I haven't heard "the apple doesn't fall far from the tree" for a very long time, either.)
    Oh, I am so sorry. I forgot to insert the word "far". Could you please fix the mistake I made in the thread?

    Thanks
     
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